About some "singular" definition in dictionary

Rogeric June

New Member
Chinese - China
Hi, everyone, first post here.

My question is, when I search the word "nap" in Collins, there is one definition as below:
3.N-SING The nap of a carpet or of a cloth such as velvet is the top layer of short threads, which usually lie smoothly in one direction.
I think, the definition should means that this word is an uncountable word here? But Collins has its own terms, from which "uncountable noun" is represented by "N-UNCOUNT".

That is really the deal where my confuse comes from. It seems that the word "nap" could be an "uncountable noun" or "collective uncountable noun" when it means "pile". So how to differentiate "N-SING", "N-UNCOUNT-COLL" and "N-SING-COLL"?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I don't have access to the Collins you seem to be referring to, but Cambridge has this definition of nap:

    nap noun (CLOTH)
    [ S ] the surface of a piece of cloth such as velvet, consisting of short threads that have been brushed in one direction​


    They gloss [ S ] : Singular noun: a noun that is used only in the singular and has no plural form.​
     

    Rogeric June

    New Member
    Chinese - China
    I don't have access to the Collins you seem to be referring to, but Cambridge has this definition of nap:

    nap noun (CLOTH)
    [ S ] the surface of a piece of cloth such as velvet, consisting of short threads that have been brushed in one direction​


    They gloss [ S ] : Singular noun: a noun that is used only in the singular and has no plural form.​
    Hi, Cagey, thanks for your reply, a lot help from it!
    It's much clearer in Cambridge, while most of others just reference it as "the singular form of countable noun".

    I still have a confusion, what's the difference between "Singular noun" and "Uncountable noun"/"Collective countable noun"?
    If consider nap as a crowd of "little hair" of leather, it should be a "Collective countable noun", am I right?
    Or as the task to count "nap" is very very impossible, can we consider it as an "uncountable noun"?

    Thanks~
     
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