about the logic of phrase 'to come up with'

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bepleased

Banned
Chinese
"The translation you pointed to me I came up with."
Could it be in this way?
About the translation you pointed to me, I came up with / had (got).

To come up with what is considered as being in response to what.


Could you tell me if my understanding is correct, please.

Thanks.
 
  • Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Welcome to the forums, bepleased.

    I'm not entirely sure I understand your sentence, but I think you may be mistaken about "come up with". It does not mean "get" in the slang sense of "understand". "Come up with" means to think of something new.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Just adding an example to my agreement with Nunty:
    "I asked you for a new concept for Ted's birthday party. What have you come up with?"
    "I asked you to research angelfish. Have you come up with anything yet?"
     

    bepleased

    Banned
    Chinese
    And my stressing is the verb phrase is a response to 'with what'.
    many in the same as its way : catch uo with / warm up (used the way of warming so close the distance with the excerse and ending in the distance become zero = up)
    close up = the action of closing used to make up the distance of lines and lines, so the 'up' is an end or reason for the action of closing.
    catch up with the robber = to (up with the robber) , unto (the police make the action of catching)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What there a question in there? :)

    As Nunty said: "Come up with" means to think of something new. The "up" doesn't function the same way in this expression as it does with "close up" or "catch up."
     

    bepleased

    Banned
    Chinese
    to think of something new

    Could I question the core of 'to think of something new'?
    Where to think, on the subject of something mew that is equal to he was convinced, of their innocence; or the table was made, in accordince with / of wood; I was possessed, of much sense.

    All of the phrases "of" are all the real subject that subject the grammar subject?
     

    Llohr

    Member
    English - American Midwest
    Well, I had prepared a very long explanation of the various uses/meanings of the word "up," but I see now that it will not be of use. You seem to be having some trouble with prepositions in general, which is not hard to imagine. Prepositions can be a very difficult part of a new language to master, as the ways in which they are used (and their "meanings") can vary so greatly.

    It is important to note that up is sometimes a preposition, for example: "We went up the hill." At other times, up can be an adjective: "The up escalator (which means "the escalator which travels upward"). It can also be an adverb: "He closed up the house." It can also be a noun: "We've had some ups and downs." It can also be a verb, "Let's up the ante."

    And even if you have two examples of uses of the word up, it does not necessarily mean the same thing. Up is frequently used idiomatically as well, which really makes things difficult.

    Of is a bit easier, as it is always a preposition when used correctly. However, like any preposition, the meaning is not always entirely clear, and it can often be easier to recognize which verbs or verb/object pairs use which preposition than to try to actually define the preposition and make a rule for its use.

    As to your final question, I must inform you that it is rather difficult to decipher, but if you're asking whether or not of is the grammatical subject of the sentence, then no, it is not, and will never be.

    Also, a table cannot be made "in accordance with" wood. I think you would probably benefit greatly from speaking with someone who speaks both English and Chinese already.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    to think of something new

    Could I question the core of 'to think of something new'?
    Where to think, on the subject of something mew that is equal to he was convinced, of their innocence; or the table was made, in accordince with / of wood; I was possessed, of much sense.

    All of the phrases "of" are all the real subject that subject the grammar subject?
    I don't understand what you mean, including what you mean by the "grammar subject". In your examples, the thing introduced by "of" is closer to the object than to the subject of the verb. I am not saying, however, that it is the object of the verb.

    Also, I don't understand what this has to do with your first question, about "up". We should have only one subject to a thread. If you are talking about something new, you should start a new thread. If you are talking about the same thing, you need to explain what it is. We still don't understand.
     
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