About the tense of an objective complement

Does this sentence make any sense to you English people?
==>> I found the city having suffered serious flood damage.

I think this sentence means that the narrator found the fact that the city had suffered a serious flood.

Can"having + past particle" be used as an objective complement?
 
  • dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    For this general structure:

    I found the city having suffered ____.

    I find the phrase "having suffered ____" modifies the subject, "I". As in:

    I found the city having suffered serious brain damage. It was a wonder I could drive at all, let alone find the city!

    I'm not sure of the exact term for this grammatical structure... I think I would say "having" is a participle, and the participle phrase presumptively modifies the subject.

    I answered the question hoping someone would correct my terminology...


     
    Thank you very much! With your comment I'm convinced that the form "having pp" is a participle here and used to imply that the event "the city suffered the flood" is prior to the event "I found/realized it"
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank you very much! With your comment I'm convinced that the form "having pp" is a participle here and used to imply that the event "the city suffered the flood" is prior to the event "I found/realized it"
    On the contrary, dharasty told you that your sentence says "I suffered the flood then found the city."
     
    Ah... I understand it..!
    Then what about my question?
    I want to know whether I can use "having + past participle" to imply that the object's event is prior to the subject's event.


    Subject-Predicate relation between object and objective complement.

    *** the time standard for the objective complement is main verb

    1) when the "objective complement" is used in the active voice.
    1-1) relative past : having + past participle???? - Here is my question's point
    1-2) concurrent : present participle or bare infinitive = [ex] I found the city prospering fast.
    1-3) relative future : infinitive = [ex] I expect the city to prosper in the future.


    2) when the "objective complement" is used in the passive voice.
    2-1) relative past : past participle = [ex] I found the city destroyed.
    2-2) concurrent : being + past participle = [ex] I found the city being destroyed.
    2-3) relative future : to be + past participle = [ex] I expected the city to be destroyed.
     
    Last edited:

    dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    Then what about my question?
    I want to know whether I can use "having + past participle" to imply that the object's event is prior to the subject's event.
    I think my answer is "no".

    But I guess I don't understand your use of the terms "objective complement", "subject's event", and "object's event".

    I think you should rely on some other grammatical construction to establish the state of the subject and object, and the relative time of when they achieved those states. (This may require two sentences.)
     
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