about to vs. almost vs. nearly...

A-friend

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
I was wondering if you could help me to fill in the following blank:
I had a close shave today when a truck was………..hit me.
a) was about to
b) almost
c) nearly
-----------------------------
{I have written this example myself}
[I am going to say something was very close to happen, but it didn’t happen. I have seen all of these three cases and even some more cases which can be used in a sentence to indicate this matter, but first I am not sure about the structure which they have to be used in then I do not know if all of these choices refer to the matter in my question, then which one is the most in common use among native speakers?!]
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I was wondering if you could help me to fill in the following blank:
    I had a close shave today when a truck was………..hit me.
    a) was about to
    b) almost
    c) nearly
    -----------------------------
    If you really want that 'was' there the sentence is beyond salvation. :) If you feel you could somehow part with it (the 'was') then both b) and c) would work for me.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    If you really want that 'was' there the sentence is beyond salvation. :) If you feel you could somehow part with it (the 'was') then both b) and c) would work for me.
    Thanks Boozer
    But one more question! What do you think of "b" and "c"? I am going to say something in spoken language but as far as I know, they sound a little bit written! Don't they? :confused:
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    None of those would be correct.

    ". . . when a truck almost hit me" or ". . . when a truck nearly hit me" [no "was"] would be correct.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I had a close shave today when a truck was about to hit me. So what happened a few seconds later? Seems to me you'd be flatter than you were beforehand. :rolleyes: "about to" does not mean the same as "almost" and "nearly". If the truck didn't hit you you would need additional context to explain why: Superman flew across the road and pulled me out of the way.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Yes, Parla, I actually said the same in my first post - the red 'was' does not belong there no matter which answer is being considered. I hope there was no misunderstanding.
     
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