abrazadera as a medical apparatus

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by pilipina, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. pilipina Senior Member

    NW United States
    English & filipino dialect
    Greetings,

    Based on the Spanish definition of abrazadera, it appears to me that it would be ok to use it as a "support" in medical usage, which I have heard people do...

    abrazadera


    • f. Pieza para asegurar alguna cosa, ciñéndola:
      abrazadera del fusil.
    'abrazadera' también aparece en estas entradas

    It appears to me that the way I hear it used is during the description of a splint, or a support of some type, hard or soft, "tablillo" or "cabestrillo" is what I think are most correct. Then even more general, and in laymans' words, "soporte", are the concepts and translations I am referring to in the same vain. Are there any opinions out there as to why abrazadera is or is not a good way to communicate the same concepts aforementioned? I am just curious why I don't see it in this sense in our forum...
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2012
  2. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Hello, Pilipina :)

    My experience is limited to the radiology field, but I hope it may somehow help you. :)

    Usually R&F remote-controlled tables for X-ray exams include different accessories that may be needed to ensure a safe patient positioning or required while performing specific radiographic procedures: "abrazadera" in this case may refer to a sort of "contention device or support" (?) such as "abrazadera de sujeción de la cabeza" (head-contention device/support).
     
  3. EricEnfermero

    EricEnfermero Senior Member

    La UCI Neonatal
    US - English
    Contention would not make sense in this context. Containment can be a noun used to indicate the restriction of motion, but in this case I think you would be looking for something much easier - like headrest or cradle.
     
  4. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Hola, Eric :)

    ¡Sí, gracias! No conocía el termino correcto en inglés, gracias! "Headrest" me parece perfecto :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...