abroad education / education abroad

toway

Senior Member
Russian
I wonder if I can use the word "abroad" not only as an adverb, but also as an adjective?
I write an article about students that prefer to get their education abroad.
Would it be right to say:

The abroad education in many cases can be at a lower price than in the students' native countries.
 
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  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's certainly an adjective, but we would put the adjective after the noun in this case (and omit the article): Education abroad . . .
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Google is not a language authority and neither is there any editing involved. It faithfully indexes every entry on the Internet, regardless of whether the entries are sound or (as is distressingly common) complete idiotic nonsense.

    It should never, ever, be used as a guide to correct English - as users of this forum have been warned over and over and over and .....
     
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    It's so lucky to see your warning, sdgraham.

    One of my English teachers told us to refer to Google results when it comes to the usage of a word.....I should have joined this forum earlier. But it's better late than never! :)
     

    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    One of my English teachers told us to refer to Google results when it comes to the usage of a word.....I should have joined this forum earlier. But it's better late than never! :)
    The best way to get reasonably accurate usage statistics is to use a corpus for searching. There are plenty of sites listed in the resources FAQ at the top of this forum.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    *Abroad education doesn't work because of the a- prefix.

    See:
    aboard passengers :cross:
    alive women :cross:
    That's an atypical rule for you to provide by this asynchronous communication. At least you're not an anonymous poster. Maybe I'll ask an atheist professor or my apathetic daughter about it. :D
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    It's certainly an adjective, but we would put the adjective after the noun in this case (and omit the article): Education abroad . . .
    Not to be pedantic, pob, (and perhaps at risk of being told to keep quiet :D), but abroad is usually considered to be an adverb, even in a construction such as "education abroad".

    In "He received his education abroad", abroad is an adverb (of place) modifying the verb received : Where did he receive it? Abroad.

    Even in "Education abroad is a good thing", abroad is still an adverb of place. Compare with "Education in another country is a good thing", where in another country is an adverbial phrase. Abroad has exactly the same grammatical role.

    Abroad can also be a noun ("We had visitors from abroad"), but I can't think of any examples where it's clearly an adjective, except just possibly in "Rumours are abroad", where it has the sense of "widespread" rather than responding to "where?".

    That said, grammatical schools of thought change so often that maybe I missed something along the way.

    Ws:)
     
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