abrupt

< Previous | Next >

AMang

Banned
Mandarin-China
Hi!
There is a question, which may seem silly. But I can not understand.
I have looked up 'abrupt' in a dictionary before, and the meaning of Chinese is easy to understand but the explanation in English is hard to understand.
Here it is, abrupt: seeming rude and unfriendly, especially because you do not waste time in friendly conversation.
The content underlined confuses me. Will it be Okay to substitute don't want to for do not? And Will it be Okay to delete friendly? I can understand 'you do not/don't want to waste time in conversation', but I feel a little strange if there is 'friendly' added.
If someone can explain it clearly, it will be appreciated very much. Thank you.
 
  • Katharina Blum

    Senior Member
    Deutsch - Österreich
    "What do you really want?", he asked abruptly.

    So while ready to continue the conversation, the person does not want to waste time exchanging pleasantries.

    So you can't delete friendly (see the definition you quote).
     

    Retired-teacher

    Senior Member
    British English
    A person who is abrupt gives very short answers to questions when longer ones might be expected. They don't take part in conversation willingly. In the following exchange person B is abrupt.

    A. Did you have a good holiday?
    B Yes
    A Was the weather good while you were there?
    B Yes
    A Was the holiday an expensive one.
    B No
    A will you go there again
    B Maybe.

    Do you get the idea?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Will it be Okay to substitute don't want to for do not?
    No. It's not a question of what the person wants or doesn't want to do. It's related to what he actually does or does not do. You could possibly reword it as "because you do not like to spend time in friendly conversation".

    And Will it be Okay to delete friendly?
    Again, no. The meaning would change. "Friendly conversation" here refers to casual social chit-chat. An abrupt person might be willing to spend time to converse with another person if the conversation has a definite purpose, but may not want to chat for the sake of having a conversation, or to just be sociable.

    and the meaning of Chinese is easy to understand
    ...the meaning in Chinese...

    Cross-posted with the above two answers.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't regard giving a series of short answers and lack of chit - chat as being abrupt.

    A better example of being abrupt is when someone gives a short, hostile/indifferent response and seeks to terminate the conversation.

    Daughter: Daddy, I'd like to introduce my new boyfriend to you.
    Father: Another time. I must go now. I need to dig the garden.
     

    Retired-teacher

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree. In the conversation that i posted earlier, I assumed that the tone of voice used for the one word answers was off-putting and meant to imply "I wish you would stop talking about it".
     

    AMang

    Banned
    Mandarin-China
    I've read all of your replies. Thank you first.
    Now I think of it in a new way, Does it mean that the person who speaks abruptly doesn't want to make a conversation which may look friendly, 'cause he thinks it's a waste of time? So he doesn't. Right?
     
    I've read all of your replies. Thank you first.
    Now I think of it in a new way, Does it mean that the person who speaks abruptly doesn't want to make a conversation which may look friendly, 'cause because he thinks it's a waste of time? So he doesn't. Right?
    No. There is no suggestion at all that the reason the person gives a short answer is because he thinks longer conversations are a waste of time. There could be many reasons why someone is abrupt, including a lack of time for longer conversation (because, for example, he is hurrying for a train that is about to leave), or a pressing emergency (he is looking for his three-year-old daughter who has wandered off, and does not have time to chat), or he is naturally taciturn, or he is deliberately trying to be rude.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Or wants to avoid an unwelcome topic or unwelcome line of questioning.

    Jenny: Darling, why were you very late coming home last night - well after 2 a.m., if I'm not mistaken.

    Jack (trying to conceal his embarrassment): Sorry, darling, must rush! Have you seen my wallet anywhere? ... I'll be home early tonight.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top