absolute, a perfect, a pure and noble freedom

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 5, Chapter One) by DH Lawrence (planetebook, here):
(background: Connie and her sister Hilda had both received aesthetically unconventional upbringing, and they visited many places, meeting all kind of people.…)

One was less in love with the boy afterwards, and a little inclined to hate him, as if he had trespassed on one's privacy and inner freedom. For, of course, being a girl, one's whole dignity and meaning in life consisted in the achievement of an absolute, a perfect, a pure and noble freedom. What else did a girl's life mean? To shake off the old and sordid connexions and subjections.

I presume female Christians or aristocrats were asked to keep the absolute, perfect, pure and noble freedom, and I feel absolute=perfect, pure=noble.
And it indicates that they were a little feministic.

Is that right please?
Thank you in advance
 
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  • LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Hi longxianchen,
    Didn't you ask about this very same passage about 2 years ago? It means, to me at least, that girls felt diminished by the loss of their virginity. This is not particularly a feminist position, nor was Lawrence a feminist.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you
    Didn't you ask about this very same passage about 2 years ago?
    I have searched for it, but didn't find similar thread.

    And here is an article: women at that time were pursuing individual freedom from men,which Lawrence didn't like.
     
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