Absolute line between two points?

Waji

Senior Member
Urdu
Hi, everyone.
Could you tell me what the line in bold means?
"I would like you to write a simple story just once more," he says, "the kind de
Maupassant wrote, or Chekhov, the kind you used to write. Just recognizable people and then write down what happened to them next." I say, "Yes, why not? That's possible." I want to please him, though I don't remember writing that way. I would like to try to tell such a story, if he means the kind that begins: "There was a woman ... " followed by plot, the absolute line between two points which I've always despised. Not for literary reasons, but because it takes all hope away. Everyone, real or invented, deserves the open destiny of life.
Source; A conversation with my father by Grace Paley.
Thanks!
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    She is referring to the plot of the story as a "line" between the beginning and the end (the two points). Evidently she considers the classic "linear" plot (telling events in order until you get to the end) to be boring or trite.
     

    Waji

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    She is referring to the plot of the story as a "line" between the beginning and the end (the two points). Evidently she considers the classic "linear" plot (telling events in order until you get to the end) to be boring or trite.
    Thanks Glenfarclas!
    Could you tell me what type of plot she is implying she likes?
     
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