absorbed <in / from> the stomach

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Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
Consider the following sentence:

This medication is primarily absorbed in the stomach.

In other words, most of the active chemicals in this medicine are absorbed (into the bloodstream, etc.) when they are passing through a person's stomach.

It seems (though I'm not quite sure yet) that some other languages, when expressing this meaning, would use words that literally mean "absorbed from", rather than "absorbed in".

In the above sentence, which languages would prefer to use "in", which would tend to use "from", and which would use neither?

Thanks
 
  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, we say "absorbé par l'estomac" (lit. absorbed by/through the stomach), but "absorbé dans l'estomac" (lit. absorbed in the stomach) would be understood too, although it is not as "academic" as the first one.

    "absorbed from the stomach" would literally be "absorbé depuis l'estomac", which would not be used in French.
     
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    Ghabi

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    It's not something one says or hears in everyday life, but when I try to say it in Cantonese only "from" (jau4 由) sounds right! Come to think of it, the English way sounds so strange!
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Intriguing indeed. We will say: "De medicatie wordt verwerkt (processed) door [door] de maag", whereas "in" seems to be possible as well, when I google... What would "from" mean in this case? The stomach as the source? With processing I cannot see "uit" begin used.

    What is the background of your question if I may ask? Is it about how we view our organs?
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    What is the background of your question if I may ask? Is it about how we view our organs?
    No, I'm just trying to figure out if there's a
    cross-linguistic pattern here.

    I was looking over the information sheets for a couple of different pharmaceutical products, written in different respective European languages, and I noticed that the texts used phrases that literallly meant "absorbed from the stomach" or similar, when the meaning was seemingly "absorbed in the stomach".

    I say "seemingly" because there was no direct English translation of these texts available, so I couldn't fully resolve why the authors wrote "from" rather than "in".
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Yes, "from" the stomach concretely means from the contents of the stomach, through the stomach wall, and into the circulatory system.

    This is the case, for example, for alcohol which is absorbed into the circulatory system as soon as it is in the stomach, through the stomach wall. This absorption is almost immediate when one drinks alcohol and does not eat at the same time.
     
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    Ghabi

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Yeah, exactly, that's why "absorbed in the stomach" sounded so weird when I thought about it consciously.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Does that not betray a different view of the organs? "By" as a means ('organon'), "in" as a place, "from" as an organism, taking in and bringing out???
    By "from" I mean "through" (they can be expressed by the same word in Cantonese). So just like Dutch door I guess.
    The funny thing is that our "door" can mean "through" but also 'by".
    Yes, "from" the stomach concretely means from the contents of the stomach, through the stomach wall, and into the circulatory system.

    This is the case, for example, for alcohol which is absorbed into the circulatory system as soon as it is in the stomach, through the stomach wall. This absorption is almost immediate when one drinks alcohol and does not eat at the same time.
    OK, now I understand how "from" is meant. We would not use Dutch "van" like that, I think. But I suppose what you are describe is what really happens… Now I see!!!
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Both seem to be used in Finnish, but to me vatsassa "in stomach" implies that the medication stays in the stomach while vatsasta "from stomach" undoubtedly means it goes through the stomach wall.
     
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