abuse something <to do> <for doing> something

phil_34

Senior Member
Do you 'abuse something to do something' or do you 'abuse something for doing something'?

1) 'The park with its large meadows and trees, its playground and its benches that invite to linger, is a cozy place. No wonder teenagers abuse it TO BUM round and toke.

2) .... No wonder teenagers abuse it FOR BUMMING ROUND AND (FOR) TOKING?
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Did you write these yourself, phil_34, or see them somewhere? It seems like an unusual use of "abuse" to me; if I needed to use "abuse," I'd probably say ". . . abuse it by. . . ."

    Edit: Crossposted with others. At least we agree.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I may be splitting hairs here, but I'm not sure it's the park that teenagers are abusing, but the easy acess to it and the possibility of "lingering" in its cozy ambiance they abuse; so they're not "lingering", they're "loitering" ('bumming/hanging around') in it, which is not what the park was intended for.
     
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    phil_34

    Senior Member
    I may be splitting hairs here, but I'm not sure it's the park that teenagers are abusing, but the easy acess to it and the possibility of "lingering" in its cozy ambiance they abuse; so they're not "lingering", they're "loitering" ('bumming/hanging around') in it, which is not what the park was intended for.
    Thanks to all of you. I've come up with these sentences myself. Yes exactly, I mean that they're abusing the easy access.

    So is it okay to say it like this? => 'The park with its large meadows and trees, its playground and its benches is a cosy place, it invites to loiter. No wonder teenagers use it for bumming round and toking.'

    I like this version even more:'No wonder teenagers use it to bum round and to toke.'
     
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    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Hi, phil, It doesn't invite 'loitering', which is an offense, it invites 'lingering'. Try "...No wonder teenageers take advantage of it to bum around..."
     
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    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    hIi, phil, I'm not sure whether forum rules allow me to point out that there should be a comma after 'park', and that you should say '..a cosy place (no comma) which invites lingering.', as we're not supposed to translate whole sentences, only those parts of sentences which are indicated in thread titles...A moderator will undoubtedly let us know!
     

    sonorous

    Banned
    Polish
    hIi, phil, I'm not sure whether forum rules allow me to point out that there should be a comma after 'park', and that you should say '..a cosy place (no comma) which invites lingering.', as we're not supposed to translate whole sentences, only those parts of sentences which are indicated in thread titles...A moderator will undoubtedly let us know!
    As far as I know they haven't forbidden this yet. :D
     

    phil_34

    Senior Member
    hIi, phil, I'm not sure whether forum rules allow me to point out that there should be a comma after 'park', and that you should say '..a cosy place (no comma) which invites lingering.', as we're not supposed to translate whole sentences, only those parts of sentences which are indicated in thread titles...A moderator will undoubtedly let us know!
    Thanks a lot ain'ttranslationfun. I'll go for '..which invites lingering. No wonder teenagers take advantage of it to bum round.'
     
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    phil_34

    Senior Member
    Hi, phil, It doesn't invite 'loitering', which is an offense, it invites 'lingering'. Try "...No wonder teenageers take advantage of it to bum around..."
    Hey ain'ttranslationfun? thanks for your comment. I have one last question regarding that sentence. (tried to send you a private message but your inbox is full). => Do I have to add the 'to' at the end of the sentence:

    'no wonder teenagers take advantage of it to bum around and TO toke.' ?
     
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