abut

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zefirus

Senior Member
Portuguese
Hi, everyone

In the sentence below:

"It consisted of three walls that abutted the mine and a dirt wall built to accomodate the door."

"It" in this case is a a room found inside a underground tunel leading to a mine.

I just can't figure out how can three walls abut a mine. If there were only two (plus the dirt one).

Probably what I can't figure out is the full menaing of "abut"

Help accepted.

This is an extract from Thaisa Frank's Heidegger's glasses.


Thank for your time

Z
 
  • morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    Hi, everyone

    In the sentence below:

    "It consisted of three walls that abutted the mine and a dirt wall built to accomodate the door."

    "It" in this case is a a room found inside a underground tunel leading to a mine.

    I just can't figure out how can three walls abut a mine. If there were only two (plus the dirt one).

    Probably what I can't figure out is the full menaing of "abut"

    Help accepted.

    This is an extract from Thaisa Frank's Heidegger's glasses.


    Thank for your time

    Z
    It may be the walls leaned upon the mound that is the mine's entrance. "To abut" may mean "to rest upon something, to lean".
    It also means "to have a common boundary", which is harder for me to imagine when takling about a mine entrance.
     

    zefirus

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Hi morzh

    Maybe I was not sufficiently clear about the context: it is not the mine entrance. This room is underground. There is a tunel which dead-ends at the mine's main room and it comes under the earth from a nearby town. I know it looks crazy, but that is the way it is.
    Sometimes I wish I could make a drawing at WR.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    I think the room had four walls, three of which were a part of the walls which constituted the walls of the mine, whereas one wall was a wall made of dirt where the door was.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    One of the meaning of the "abut" is "to serve as an abutment".

    One of the meaning of the "abutment is:
    "The part of a structure that bears the weight or pressure of an arch"

    So is it possible the walls form a structure that also support the weight of something on top of it.

    Here;s from mining dictionary:




    A
    Abutment In coal mining, (1) the weight of the rocks above a narrow roadway is transferred to the solid coal along the sides, which act as abutments of the arch of strata spanning the roadway; and (2) the weight of the rocks over a longwall face is transferred to the front abutment, that is, the solid coal ahead of the face and the back abutment, that is, the settled packs behind the face.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Mine passages aren't always in a single line. Perhaps the mine had several passages at angles to each other. In that case, a room could (if we imagine looking at it from above) have three walls whose other sides are the walls of mine passages. Its entrance would be on the fourth wall, at the end of the tunnel that leads away from the mine to that nearby town.

    I think this is more or less what LilianaB had in mind, too.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, that is what I meant. My father designed mines, mostly coal mines in different countries, but unfortunately he is no longer alive. I think this would make sense somehow from what I know about mines.
     

    zefirus

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Right on the nose, Liliana.

    Three walls dug in coal, like a side enclosure by the tunel that they isolated with another wall, this one made of dirt with a door on it giving a passage to the tunel itself.
    I would never get it without your help fellows.

    Thanks a lot

    Z
     
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