Accept a child as his own

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

A man and a woman are in a relationship and after some time the woman gets pregnant, and the man refuses to accept he is the father of the child. Then the baby is born and a DNA test is conducted and the woman proves that the man is the father of the child. But even so the man refuses to accept the child, for example, by visiting, looking after, helping with money, etc. My question: I'm looking for an expression for this situation; is "accept the child as his own" natural/correct in this case (in the examples I made below)?

a. John only accepted the child as his own after a DNA test and a lot of advice from his family.
b. Mike doesn't accept the child as his own in spite of a DNA test and a lot of advice from his family.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "As his own" would be fine for me, although a trifle literary. Sound shift's suggestions are okay as well (although I would want to add "that" after "accept(ed)"). But there's a possible difference between accepting the fact of paternity on the one hand and accepting a child emotionally as "your own" on the other.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much.

    But there's a possible difference between accepting the fact of paternity on the one hand and accepting a child emotionally as "your own" on the other.
    Yes, the emotional acceptance is more relevant in all cases. So I think if I've undertood it correctly "accept a child" + "as your own" would cover both (genetics and emotionally). Right?

    Thank you in advance!
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    Thank you very much.



    Yes, the emotional acceptance is more relevant in all cases. So I think if I've undertood it correctly "accept a child" + "as your own" would cover both (genetics and emotionally). Right?

    Thank you in advance!
    I've heard "accept a child as your own" ONLY in the cases when the child is not actually related to you. To me, there is an unstated implication that you are accepting the child "as if it were your own."
    I think that's why there seems to be some disagreement.
    I suppose you could use it in the other sense but it might cause some confusion.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much.

    Can I use "accept" to include both material and emotional acceptance of a child by their parent?

    a. John only accepted the child after a DNA test and a lot of advice from his family.
    b. Mike doesn't accept the child in spite of a DNA test and a lot of advice from his family.
    Thank you in advance!
     
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