acceptable

Avto

Member
Georgian
Hi,

A partner asked my company to organise a meeting and suggested date and time. The date and time is OK for us. Can I send them the following sentence: Please be informed that the suggested date and time is acceptable for us? Or is there any other word?

Thank you!
 
  • Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    Acceptable and convenient are both fine from a language standpoint. However, there is also a cultural issue. Where is your partner located?

    The reason I ask is that saying the time is "acceptable" at least in AE is very stiff and formal, as is your "please be informed" sentence. I would only use that sentence if I was in litigation with the person. It is extremely cold and formal.

    I don't much like convenient as that's not the point. If I write to ask if you can meet with me at a certain time, I'm not necessarily asking about your convenience. I want to know if you are saying yes or no to my suggestion. Essentially I am looking for your availability. You might decide to make yourself available even if it is not convenient. Certainly we do so all the time in business!

    For an informal meeting with a business partner I might say something like the below. The first is very enthusiastic and the second is a bit more restrained:

    Yes, we would love to meet with you at 3 p.m. Thursday. Look forward to it!
    Yes, we are available to meet with you at 3 p.m. on Thursday. See you then!

    If your partner is British, I would wait for a suggestion from a British speaker.
     
    Last edited:

    GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    It may not have been the question, but the idea behind "convenient" is that it will give the sense of "yes, we are available at the suggested time", hence the reason that I chose it as an alternative...
     

    Avto

    Member
    Georgian
    You're right. The idea of my sentence is "yes, we are available at the suggested time", as you thought.
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    It may not have been the question, but the idea behind "convenient" is that it will give the sense of "yes, we are available at the suggested time", hence the reason that I chose it as an alternative...
    I understand! I was giving more of a cultural perspective. As someone on the East Coast of the U.S., replying that the time is convenient would come off as stiff to me. It is sounds to my ears as somewhat off topic, perhaps because in the U.S. business world we often make ourselves available even when not convenient. I would only respond by saying "that's convenient, thank you!" if the other party went out of their way to accommodate my schedule and geographic location.

    I make a lot of dates for my job and no one in the U.S. ever says that is convenient to accept an appointment. They may possibly say it is not convenient to decline, but when they want to say yes, most people say that works or that's good for me or I'm available.
     

    GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    Well, perhaps the more appropriate sense would be to say "we would like to confirm the suggested meeting time and date", thus getting the meaning across in a short, concise and formal manner...

    :)
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    Well, perhaps the more appropriate sense would be to say "we would like to confirm the suggested meeting time and date", thus getting the meaning across in a short, concise and formal manner...

    :)
    Good option for this thread. Just a note, in the U.S. "we would like to confirm" would more likely be used after both parties had already agreed. So I might write at first that I'm available and then, the day before the meeting send a follow-up email that says, "I'm writing to confirm our meeting for tomorrow at 3 p.m. at your offices."

    However, that's al nuance. For a company dealing with a partner internationally (possibly in the U.K., Iran, wherever) this does seem like good neutral language which is professional without being too stiff.
     
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