accepting or yielding to a superior force

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
submission
1) the action of accepting or yielding to a superior force or to the will or authority of another person
they were forced into submission
Oxforddictionaries

Should it read as "accepting to a superior force" or "accepting a superior force" (and the "to" refers to 'yielding' only)?
If both are possible, what is the difference between them?
Thank you.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    One "yields to" something or someone. One does not "accept to" in English.

    I would not use "accepting a superior force" as a complete synonym to "yielding," however.

    I accept the fact that the U.S. Army is a superior force compared with my own defenses, but since we not confronting each other, there is nothing to which I have to yield.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    "accepting a superior force" (and the "to" refers to 'yielding' only)?
    :thumbsup: (They could have avoided the 'unfortunateness' if they'd said the action of yielding to or accepting ...:rolleyes:)

    Yielding is more ... erm ... yielding than accepting. If you accept a superior force you say, "Oh okay, fair enough, I accept that you're superior." If you yield to it you say, "Your force is superior to mine, o great one, I lay down my arms and kneel to you." (This is rather exaggerated to make the point:cool:)
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top