access

Sophie Nomade

Senior Member
French
Hello to everybody,

I find the word "access" sometimes very difficult to use correctly when I want to refer to the persons or organizations that have the right to enter. When I want to say that someone can enter a place, I can talk about the access to this place, but which word should I use to introduce the person whose right to enter I'm discussing? Is "of" the correct word - "access of a person to a place"? In this case, it sounds OK, but in other cases, I'm really confused. For example, in a table in a text I'm currently revising, they are talking about the types of providers that can (have the right to) be active in various sectors. One of the sectors is accessible to all types of providers; in other words, all types of providers have the right to provide services in this sector, so the text in the cell says:

Open access to every type of registered providers, including for-profit sector providers

"to" definitely sounds wrong to me here (but maybe I'm mistaken?! – it seems to me that it gives the impression that it is the providers we have access to), but what else could I use? "for"? Or is it, more fundamentally, the use of the word "access" which is wrong here?

Thank you very much in advance for your help! J
 
  • FrankyFourFingers

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Sophie, "Open access for every type of registered providers, including for-profit sector providers" sounds ok to me, for one of those mysterious aspects that rule the usage of prepositions.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'm sorry. I didn't read carefully. You're right. This is about the providers having access.

    I wouldn't use "access" in this context, actually, unless someone is providing the access to the providers. To have the right to operate in a certain sector is not the same as having access to that sector. I would simply say, "Open to every type of provider..."
     

    Sophie Nomade

    Senior Member
    French
    "Access to" is definitely the right combination, in my experience. "Access of" sounds very odd.

    The only thing I would change in your example would be to drop the "s" on the first "providers":

    Open access to every type of registered provider, including for-profit sector providers
    So it would be the same preposition in these two sentences:
    - Open access to every type of registered provider, if I want to say that people can have access to every type of provider (when they need a service);
    and
    - Open access to every type of registered provider, if I want to say that all providers can have access to the market and have the right to provide their services (which is what is meant in my original sentence)?

    Thank you for your answers!
     

    Sophie Nomade

    Senior Member
    French
    I'm sorry. I didn't read carefully. You're right. This is about the providers having access.

    I wouldn't use "access" in this context, actually, unless someone is providing the access to the providers. To have the right to operate in a certain sector is not the same as having access to that sector. I would simply say, "Open to every type of provider..."
    Great, thank you! This answers my question. :) So my doubts about the very use of the term "access" here were grounded...
    I will change the sentence and use "Open to...". :)
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    You can use "access", but you want to change its position in the sentence, and reword it slightly:
    All registered providers, including for-profit sector providers, have access
    or
    Access is given to all registered providers, including... (etc.)
     

    Sophie Nomade

    Senior Member
    French
    I wouldn't use "access" in this context, actually, unless someone is providing the access to the providers. To have the right to operate in a certain sector is not the same as having access to that sector.
    In fact, just to give one more element which might be relevant, given what you explain, in the home care sector, organizations have to comply with a set of rules in order to be granted an "accreditation", and only accredited providers (which can only be non-profit or public organizations, never private for-profit orgnaizations) have the right to provide home care services.

    In the other sector (the one we are talking about here), all types of providers (public, private non-profit, and private for-profit orgnaizations) can have access (?) to the market and offer their services to potential users. Would you say, in such case, that we can talk about "access", and that they are granted access though public regulation? Or would you still suggest using simply "open to"?

    Thank you again,

    Sophie
     

    Sophie Nomade

    Senior Member
    French
    You can use "access", but you want to change its position in the sentence, and reword it slightly:
    All registered providers, including for-profit sector providers, have access
    or
    Access is given to all registered providers, including... (etc.)
    It would be better not to use a whole sentence here, because this is used in a table, and all the other cells have phrases, not whole sentences. Would it be correct to say then:

    Access given to all registered providers...

    Thank you to all of you for your help! :)
     

    cyco

    Member
    English (US)
    So it would be the same preposition in these two sentences:
    - Open access to every type of registered provider, if I want to say that people can have access to every type of provider (when they need a service);
    and
    - Open access to every type of registered provider, if I want to say that all providers can have access to the market and have the right to provide their services (which is what is meant in my original sentence)?

    Thank you for your answers!
    I would use "to" in the first and "for" in the second. Using "to" for both wouldn't be entirely incorrect (to be honest, I'm not sure if there is a rule or what it is), but "for" sounds better to me.
     
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