accessable elevator? [accessible]

  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This means an elevator designed for easier use by those with physical disabilities. The exact nature of the modifications is unspecified: it could include lower buttons that can be reached from a wheelchair, Braille notations on buttons and voice announcements of floors, doors that can be made to stay open longer than usual for someone who enters or exists slowly ...

    I'd probably spell it accessible, though.

    Added in edit: Sorry, cross-posted with the above requests for context. Moderators should feel free to delete if this post violates forum rules.
     

    gladorient

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Sorry everybody, I purposefully omitted the context because I want to see your instinctive reaction. That was a sign in a subway station which pointed to an elevator for disadvantaged people like someone in a wheelchair. I have a doubt on whether it is good use. And thanks to Egmont for your correction, I misspelt it.
     
    Last edited:

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I believe we have a quite similar sign in our building at work. Signs are designed to convey maximal information with a minimum of words; I think it works fine for that.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sorry everybody, I purposefully omitted the context because I want to see your instinctive reaction.
    Please remember for the future that all questions require context -- otherwise, it's a guessing game. These threads become a resource that members can search like a dictionary -- and they'll be looking for answers, not guesswork. (And three posts out of seven in this thread aren't supplying any information related to the topic.)
     

    gladorient

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    As a matter of fact, a lot of weird English signs are seen in China today. Instead of "Exit", they put on a sign "Way Out"; a lounge in a bus terminal is labeled as "rest room". The "accessible elevator" is actually an improvement of a previous "disabled elevator". Chinglish flourishes as China hastens to "internationalize".
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    That was a sign in a subway station which pointed to an elevator for disadvantaged people like someone on in a wheelchair. I have a doubt on whether it is good use. And thanks to Egmont for your correction, I misspelt it.
    Are you sure it said "Accessible Elevator"? An elevator (or anything) would be of no use at all if it were inaccessible (if no one could get to it).

    The usual wording would be: Wheelchair-Accessible Elevator, to say that it is not only usable by people walking, but the elevator and its entrance are large enough to accommodate a wheelchair.
     

    gladorient

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Are you sure it said "Accessible Elevator"? An elevator (or anything) would be of no use at all if it were inaccessible (if no one could get to it).

    The usual wording would be: Wheelchair-Accessible Elevator, to say that it is not only usable by people walking, but the elevator and its entrance are large enough to accommodate a wheelchair.
    It sure is. As I said in the previous post, it is one of the "weird English signs" now flourishing in China. And that is why I want to know how native speakers will understand it.
     

    gladorient

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    This one is not weird. It is the standard BE term, found on signs in every London underground station.
    Really? I thought it is Chinglish, because I have only seen it used in "we had no way out". I didn't know it is a synonym of "exit".
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Are you sure it said "Accessible Elevator"? An elevator (or anything) would be of no use at all if it were inaccessible (if no one could get to it).

    The usual wording would be: Wheelchair-Accessible Elevator, to say that it is not only usable by people walking, but the elevator and its entrance are large enough to accommodate a wheelchair.
    I understood "Accessible Elevator" immediately to mean an elevator which disabled individuals could easily use. A Google search turns up many instances where accessible is used in this fashion without the qualifying words "disabled" or "handicapped"--as in, for example, "accessible entrance"--and the following advice is given on page 206 of Who Are You Calling a Clown? by Deborah Bennison, a writer's guide published in Great Britain:

    Accessible toilet/accessible entrance/accessible parking space

    Avoid the terms 'disabled toilet', 'disabled entrance' and 'disabled parking space'.
    Note that putting it this way avoids getting the sign writer involved in the controversies concerning the words disabled and handicapped.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...

    Accessible toilet/accessible entrance/accessible parking space

    Avoid the terms 'disabled toilet', 'disabled entrance' and 'disabled parking space'.
    Note that putting it this way avoids getting the sign writer involved in the controversies concerning the words disabled and handicapped.
    It also avoids the grammatically correct, though semantically erroneous, interpretation that the toilet, entrance, etc., are themselves disabled - whatever one may take that to mean.
     
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