accident resulted in nine people being injured

Leafka

Senior Member
Polish
Hi,

I am writing about an accident at a company: 'The accident resulted in the death of three workers and nine people being injured.' I am unsure if I can say that an accident results in people being injured. Is it correct?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "the accident left three workers dead and nine injured, isn't it?
    This version sounds ordinary to me. It may be more common than Leafka's version, but I don't think Leafka needs to change his (?) version.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Owlman that your original sentence is acceptable, but . . .
    It's more common to hear "the accident left three workers dead and nine injured", isn't it?
    Yes, that's probably the wording we're more likely to hear in a news report.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    In "The accident resulted in nine people being injured", is it possible to leave out "being" and say "The accident resulted in nine people injured" to mean the same thing?
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In "The accident resulted in nine people being injured", is it possible to leave out "being" and say "The accident resulted in nine people injured" to mean the same thing?
    No. In "the accident resulted in nine people being injured", the object of "resulted in" is "being injured", with "nine people" as its subject, which makes sense, while in "the accident resulted in nine people injured", "nine people" is acting as the object of "resulted in", which doesn't make sense, as accidents can't result in (nine) people.

    Native speakers are welcome to kick in comments.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I agree with owlman and Parla that your original sentence is acceptable, Leafka. However, there's one thing that I find a little awkward in it, and it's a point of style, not of grammar. As you've written it, the sentence is unbalanced: "the death of three workers" and "nine people being injured" are different constructions. That's not incorrect, but the sentence would be smoother if you had parallel structures.

    Unfortunately, "the death of three workers and the injury of nine people", while balanced, doesn't quite sound idiomatic. Nor does "three workers dying and nine people being injured".

    Sunyaer's suggestion is both balanced and natural-sounding, which is perhaps why, as Parla said, you're more likely to hear it: "The accident left three workers dead and nine people injured". (I've added "people", because the original didn't say they were all workers.)

    Sunyaer, I agree with your analysis of JungKim's suggestion, except for one tiny detail: for me, the object in the first sentence isn't "being injured" but the whole noun phrase "nine people being injured". However, that changes nothing in the rest of your explanation, nor in your conclusions.

    Ws
    :)
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Sunyaer, I agree with your analysis of JungKim's suggestion, except for one tiny detail: for me, the object in the first sentence isn't "being injured" but the whole noun phrase "nine people being injured". However, that changes nothing in the rest of your explanation, nor in your conclusions.
    Ws
    :)
    So do you agree with Sunyaer that In "The accident resulted in nine people being injured", it's not possible to leave out "being"?

    I'm asking for your confirmation on this, because if the object is the whole noun phrase "nine people being injured" then I don't know what's stopping you from leaving out the "being".
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    No, you can't leave out "being" in that sentence. "Being" is actually the direct object here. If someone were being very fussy, he might insist on: "... resulted in nine people's being injured." The possessive makes it clear that "being" is not a present progressive but a gerund. These possessives are usually dropped in conversation, although many people would regard "You being here makes me so happy" as an error and only accept "Your being here makes me so happy."
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    So do you agree with Sunyaer that In "The accident resulted in nine people being injured", it's not possible to leave out "being"?

    I'm asking for your confirmation on this, because if the object is the whole noun phrase "nine people being injured" then I don't know what's stopping you from leaving out the "being".
    Glenfarclas has already answered, but I agree with him and with sunyaer that you shouldn't leave out "being".

    It doesn't really matter whether you consider the direct object to be the gerund "being" or the noun phrase (or 'gerund phrase') "nine people being injured". Some grammarians prefer the first approach, others the second.

    If you take the whole noun phrase as the object, the gerund "being" is effectively its head: it's like "the being injured of nine people". (Of course we never say that, but it's the equivalent of "nine people's being injured", as Glen said.) Clearly you can't omit the head of a noun phrase.

    That said, I can understand your thinking, JungKim. Playing devil's advocate for the moment, I might argue as follows:
    - "The accident left nine people injured" is fine. You don't need "being". So why not "resulted in nine people injured"? Perhaps "resulted in" needs a gerund as (or in) its object? Well, no, because you can say ...
    - "The accident resulted in several injuries".

    I think sunyaer put his finger on it. It's a semantic issue, rather than a grammatical one.
    - "The accident left nine people injured" is OK, because we consider that an accident can leave people [in a certain state]. In what state did it leave them? – Injured.
    - "The accident resulted in several injuries" is OK, because injuries can be the result of an accident.
    - "The accident resulted in nine people injured" doesn't work, because people can't be the result of an accident — whereas their being injured can be.

    Ws:)
     
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