... accidentally hit the shower thing. All of her clothes were drying upstairs.

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
— She was babysitting down the street. So I went over there. Turns out that, uh, she was giving the kid a bath, and accidentally hit the shower thing.
All of her clothes were drying upstairs. So she plops down right on the kitchen floor, under Mr. Coffee, she looks up at me and she says: "I think I'm in the mood."

Risky Business, film

Does the bolded part mean she accidentally turned on the water, wet her clothes, and, as a result, had to hang them to dry?
Or had her clothes already been drying when that "shower thing" happened?
Thanks.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Her clothes had got wet when she accidentally switched on the shower as she was giving a child a bath. She had presumably taken them off upstairs where one would expect the bathroom to be and had left them to dry up there. I can't explain why but some houses have washing and drying machines upstairs, in the USA at least.
    I leave the rest to your imagination ... .
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    She was giving the baby a bath and probably filling the tub. She accidentally hit the knob that actuates the shower and all her clothes that she was wearing got wet. She then hung her clothes to dry.

    Crossed posts with Hermoine. Her fertile imagination progressed further than mine.:D
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It's just, the second boldfaced sentence is confusing, it doesn't grammatically look like a normal sequence of events. And in the next sentence he even shifts to Historical Present.

    Thank you everyone.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Because that's where the bedrooms, and therefore the dirty and clean clothes, are. :) It's very practical.
    It is only in the houses without elevators. The ones with elevators generally have the laundry room in the basement. Almost all American homes have elevators (I am promoting the myth of America.) Insurance companies do not like the upstairs laundry rooms, as a burst hose can cause far more damage than the basement installation.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ah yes, it does make very good sense. I meant that's the only reason I could think of for her clothes being upstairs. I had a washing machine upstairs in the bathroom in France, but I've never heard of them being upstairs in a British house. Lots of people still hang their clothes out in the garden. It adds to the drama of suburban life I suppose.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Ah yes, it does make very good sense. I meant that's the only reason I could think of for her clothes being upstairs. I had a washing machine upstairs in the bathroom in France, but I've never heard of them being upstairs in a British house. Lots of people still hang their clothes out in the garden. It adds to the drama of suburban life I suppose.
    Or there was a dryer rack in the upstairs bathroom, and none in the other bathrooms. Typically there is only one of these in a home and it is usually left in the bathroom in which it resides. But that does not alter the meaning of the original post. Her clothes got wet; she took them off and left them upstairs to dry.
     
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