"accommodate" the most discerning of royal tastes

Mnemon

Senior Member
Persian - پارسی - 𐎱𐎾𐎿𐎡
As you can see, we're well equipped to accommodate the most discerning of royal tastes.
Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas animated movie

"Accommodate" here doesn't make much sense to me! Can "tastes" be accommodated? :confused: Perhaps "satisfy" could be a good choice?
Can someone clarify the matter?
Thanks in advance.
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    From the WR dictionary:

    to provide suitably;
    supply (usually fol. by with):

    To accommodate in that context means that the person can provide/supply whatever is needed to satisfy the desires of the person.

    It's expected that the desires of royalty are harder to accommodate than regular people, but they are ready for that.
     

    Mnemon

    Senior Member
    Persian - پارسی - 𐎱𐎾𐎿𐎡
    Hello Kentix and thanks.
    From the WR dictionary:

    to provide suitably;
    supply (usually fol. by with):

    To accommodate in that context means that the person can provide/supply whatever is needed to satisfy the desires of the person.

    It's expected that the desires of royalty are harder to accommodate than regular people, but they are ready for that.
    But the problem here lies in the fact that the use that you have already mentioned, as WRD asserted, usually comes with the preposition "with",
    to provide suitably;
    supply (usually fol. by with):to accommodate a friend with money.
    And more importantly, I suppose, It requires an object. Accommodate with "what"?
    accommodate the most discerning of royal tastes <with what?>
    Don't you think that way?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's a standard usage.

    We can accommodate your every whim.

    I don't believe the word "usually" is identical to the word "always". :)

    This definition is from Dictionary.com. It's closer to the use in your sentence.

    to do a kindness or a favor to; oblige:
    to accommodate a friend by helping him move to a new apartment.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello Kentix and thanks.

    But the problem here lies in the fact that the use that you have already mentioned, as WRD asserted, usually comes with the preposition "with",

    And more importantly, I suppose, It requires an object. Accommodate with "what"?
    accommodate the most discerning of royal tastes <with what?>
    Don't you think that way?
    No. The phrase in the film is fine. If it continued on it would need a with.

    To accomodate the most discerning of royal tastes *with* caviar and chocolate.

    Or indeed it doesn't have to be food, tastes could be material comfort and habits.

    This is like your sample sentence saying ''to accomodate a friend with money" but cut off "to accommodate a friend" but not giving details.

    I am always happy to accomodate a friend. Last we I accommodated a friend with money, and this week I'm loaning him my car.

    It isn't a word we use a lot in every day speech these days. Perhaps more in the hotel and restaurant industry.
     
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