accommodate

Jiung

Member
Chinese, Taiwan
Dear friends,

I read a sentence from a English-learning book:

Our employees are working longer hours to accommodate the extra orders and supplies are still plentiful.

Does it mean: Our employees are working longer hours to accommodate the extra orders and therefore, the supplies are still plentiful.

Thanks
Jiung
 
  • viajero_canjeado

    Senior Member
    English - Southeastern USA
    I don't think the "therefore" is necessary - that implies a cause-effect relationship. The two ideas seem sort of separate to me, or the second could even be understood as exclamatory: one might have thought that with all the extra orders supplies would run low, but contrary to this assumption, supplies are still plentiful!
     

    Jiung

    Member
    Chinese, Taiwan
    Thanks viajero_canjeado,

    I just wonder is it possible that because the employees are working long hours, the supplies are therefore plentiful. Because if the supplies are plentiful, the employees are no need to work long hours. I just don't understand why these two parts are put in one sentence.

    Thanks
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The reference to "supplies" was probably inserted to preclude an argument. Logically if the employees are working extra hours to make more products, supplies should become low. The sentence claims that despite the high production, "supplies are still plentiful."
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Jiung, I believe your first post is right.

    The sentence means that people are working longer hours in order to create the supply stock necessary for the business.

    I imagine your excerpt was in response to a question such as:

    "Do you still have vanilla-scented panties in stock?"
     
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