accommodation [countable and uncountable?]

legendaaary

Senior Member
French
Hello everybody,

I'm a bit confused here. In my grammar books accommodation is an uncountable noun and I saw that in American English you could write it "accommodations", that's not where I am confused. In, fact, it was mentioned in another site that it could be both countable and uncountable. So, do you say:

There is/are great accommodation/accommodations by the beach ???

I know you can have uncountable nouns ending with 's' that are singular, 'news', but 'police' or 'family' are uncountable nouns that could be used as plural when talking about a group of people. Is that right?

Thank you in advance for your answers
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Accommodation is never countable for me, so I'd always say 'There is great accommodation by the beach'. You'll have to wait for an AmE speaker to respond about whether it can be both countable and uncountable in AmE in this context.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hotel rooms and other conveniences for travellers are "accomodations" in American English. "There is great accommodation by the beach" suggests to me that the people near the beach are very accommodating. "There are great accommodations by the beach" means there are nice places to stay.
     

    legendaaary

    Senior Member
    French
    Thank you so much for your answers.
    Sorry natkretep for not answering any earlier, I was also waiting for an American suggestion if I may say. I have to say that I'm a bit confused now.

    Myridon, when you say "the people near the beach are very accommodating", what does it mean exactly? :eek:
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm not Myridon, but it means "the people are very willing to make changes to meet with your requests."

    "Accomodations," in the sense of hotel rooms and the like, is always plural in AE, even when we talk about one room in one hotel.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    "There are great accommodations by the beach" means there are nice places to stay.
    "Accomodations," in the sense of hotel rooms and the like, is always plural in AE, even when we talk about one room in one hotel.
    So, in American English, how would you describe it when there is just one place that is nice to stay? Would you avoid using "accommodation(s)" and instead mention the type of accommodations (e.g. "There's a great hotel by the beach"), or say "There's a great place to stay by the beach"?
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English

    So, in American English, how would you describe it when there is just one place that is nice to stay? Would you avoid using "accommodation(s)" and instead mention the type of accommodations (e.g. "There's a great hotel by the beach"), or say "There's a great place to stay by the beach"?
    Yes. I've successfully avoided using "accommodations" in this sense for many years; it's a word I leave to travel agents and advertisements.
     
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