accommodation Vs. accommodations

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
Hello teachers,

I looked up the word "accommodation" in Longman Dictionary, it says:

In British English it's: accommodation.

But

In American English it's: accommodations. (with an s at the end)

This is my question: accommodations in American English with this form (with "s" at the end) is still singular or the "s" refers to it's plural form?
I also checked the title in the forum but couldn't find any thread related to my question.

No source/Self made question
Many thanks in advance
 
  • sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    No, it's plural, even when it essentially means "hotel room." "Our accommodations were excellent."
    If it's plural then can you use it with numbers or not? For example, three accommodations, four accommodations , etc.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Not really - we would say "accommodations for three" or some such thing. It's kind of like "pants;" it takes a plural verb ("My pants are tight"), but we don't say "two pants." Would you call that "uncountable plural"? I'm not much on grammar terms.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    Not really - we would say "accommodations for three" or some such thing. It's kind of like "pants;" it takes a plural verb ("My pants are tight"), but we don't say "two pants." Would you call that "uncountable plural"? I'm not much on grammar terms.
    Good point thank you. I am not sure whether it's called "uncountable plural" but if not then you found a good definition for it. (I mean "uncountable plural"):thumbsup::)
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    There seems to be a lot of conflicting information about the word "accommodation". The Cambridge and MacMillan dictionaries list the word as uncountable, but then it says "accommodations" is American. And according to WR dictionary, it's countable and plural. It's really confusing.
     
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