accommodation

  • rippledj

    Member
    English - American/Canadian
    Accommodation is most commonly expressed as an uncountable noun, however, it can also be expressed as a countable noun as some uncountables can.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Please provide context, Novice 81. What are you talking about? Somewhere to stay or live? Please put the phrase in a sentence that makes its meaning clear, as it is impossible to answer correctly otherwise.
     

    novice_81

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi
    I was thinking about somewhere to stay, so I guess it's correct to use "an".
    But I suppose, since it's an uncountable noun, that it's better to say: some accommodation.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    You should consider it uncountable in the sense of a place to stay or live, at least in this context:
    "I'm looking for accommodation," or "some accommodation". "Some" is not necessary, at least in British English.

    But accommodation also means "a settlement of differences", and in this case is countable. "We came to an accommodation" (settled our differences).
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You should consider it uncountable in the sense of a place to stay or live, at least in this context:
    "I'm looking for accommodation," or "some accommodation". "Some" is not necessary, at least in British English.
    This is true for the UK, where a list of hotels often bears the heading "Accommodation", but in the USA "Accommodations" sometimes (usually?) appears at the head of such lists.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top