accompany with something

  • CHS

    New Member
    SPANISH/English CHILE
    Hi mimi2:
    If by richness you mean wealth, I would say "wealth comes together with happiness" or ...brings along happiness.
    CHS
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank you very much. However, I want to practice "accompany with". Please help me correct it.
     

    ChrissyH

    Member
    English England
    Hello mimi2,
    As I understand things, one could say : the roast beef was accompanied with potatoes and green beans; his speech was accompanied with gestures. Both these examples are in the passive to indicate "done with or found with, there's a kind of supplement.
    However, when we say, for example,"the pills may be accompanied by side effects" we are talking more about a result.
    Having said all this, when I speak I'm not sure that I pay great attention, and I probably use "with" when I should say "by" and vice versa!
     

    CHS

    New Member
    SPANISH/English CHILE
    Then, let`s say that "accompany with" should be used when you add something (like a salad or wine) to an already existing whole (to follow my lead, a delecious steak), therefore " I enjoy much better my steak accompanied with avocado. Does it help you?
    CHS
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank you both of you very much.
    Your explanations are hepful. I understand them quickly.
    I'd like to come back to my sentence. Please tell me if it is right because this time, I corrected it a little. " Wealth is not always accompanied with happiness."
    Thanks.
     

    ChrissyH

    Member
    English England
    Well, to be honest Sister, I feel more comfortable with accompany by, and I would say "come with".

    With regards to your sentence Mimi2, I would say the same thing, ie: Wealth is not always accompanied by happiness. I would say this, a) because it sounds better to me and b) because perhaps one could argue that happiness is not a result of wealth...
     

    damocle1

    New Member
    Italian
    Hi everybody,
    I jump into this old thread because I have a question related to the use of "accompany with"...
    The context is like this: I am writing a letter to a colleague (much senior, so it is a very formal one) and along with the letter I will send a copy of my cv.
    Can I put this sentence towards the end: "I accompany this letter with a copy of my CV...."? I do not want to use "enclose" (I enclose a copy of my cv...) because the letter and the cv are separate and do not come in the same file (or folder), so the meaning would be slightly different.
    Is it correct?

    many thanks :)
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    No. That's saying you are accompanying your letter (you are sending yourself through the mail), and carrying your CV with you. :D

    I don't really understand what you are doing, though. Are you sending two letters through the actual mail, or sending a separate email attachment, or what?
     

    damocle1

    New Member
    Italian
    Thanks pob14!
    I may have to send both through actual mail and via email. In the first case, I would put two separate envelopes in a bigger one, so that the person who receives that would open the letter first, then the cv. In case of email, there will be two separate attachments...
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    If they are all in the same envelope, "enclose" is fine; they're both "enclosed" in the very same outer envelope. (If I were sending it, there would be the mailing envelope, and inside would be my letter (not enclosed in anything else), and the envelope containing the CV.) It's the same idea if it's two attachments to the same email; you can just say "attached."
     
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