accompany

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Is the verb "accompany" used in this case?
"I sing and accompany myself on the guitar."
Thank you very much.
 
  • LouisaB

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    To 'accompany' in the musical sense means 'to support with another instrument'. Someone who plays the piano for someone else to sing to is 'an accompanist'.

    But someone who sings and plays the piano (or guitar, or whatever) simultaneously is therefore accompanying himself...

    LouisaB
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank all of you very much for your kind help.
    Because it is rather hard to use "accompany" can I say simplier:
    "I sing and play the guitar at the same time"?
    Thanks.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thank all of you very much for your kind help.
    Because it is rather hard to use "accompany" can I say simplier:
    "I sing and play the guitar at the same time"?
    Thanks.
    If you're going to forego the use of "accompany" (which I still think is the best way to say it because the use of the word "accompany" indicates singing and playing simultaneously), I don't think you need to specify "at the same time". You wouldn't say "I accompany myself on the guitar at the same time". I would simply say "I sing and play guitar".
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    If you're going to forego the use of "accompany" (which I still think is the best way to say it because the use of the word "accompany" indicates singing and playing simultaneously), I don't think you need to specify "at the same time". You wouldn't say "I accompany myself on the guitar at the same time". I would simply say "I sing and play guitar".
    It means that there is a difference between "simultaneously" and "at the same time". In my language there is no difference. Can you help me clarify it.
    I'm wondering why I can say this: " I read and listen to music at the same time."
    Thank you very much.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It means that there is a difference between "simultaneously" and "at the same time". In my language there is no difference. Can you help me clarify it.
    I'm wondering why I can say this: " I read and listen to music at the same time."
    Thank you very much.
    As usual, I'm not explaining myself very well, Mimi2!:) "Simultaneously" and "at the same time" mean the same thing. "Accompany" in your example sentence carries a strictly musical reference and clarifies that you're doing both at the same time although I don't think it's necessary to be that specific. You can say "I sing and play guitar at the same time" but anyone who knows about singing and guitar-playing would understand that you mean that you do both at the same time if you said "I sing and play guitar".
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Hi, Falcons,
    Can I say " my shadow accompanies me."?
    Thanks.
    This is a slightly different use of accompany.
    It is an obvious statement. It uses accompany in the sense of 'to occur, coexist or be associated with'.

    I would definitely suggest that you use 'accompany' when speaking of singing and playing a musical instrument at the same time.
    accompany to provide musical accompaniment for a performer.
    accompaniment music a subordinate part for an instrument, voices or an orchestra.
    It is the only way that I know of that this concept is expressed in English.
    All musicians who play music to their own voice are said to accompany themselves with a (musical instrument). If you say it this way your meaning will not be unclear.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    This is a slightly different use of accompany.
    It is an obvious statement. It uses accompany in the sense of 'to occur, coexist or be associated with'.

    I would definitely suggest that you use 'accompany' when speaking of singing and playing a musical instrument at the same time.
    accompany to provide musical accompaniment for a performer.
    accompaniment music a subordinate part for an instrument, voices or an orchestra.
    It is the only way that I know of that this concept is expressed in English.
    All musicians who play music to their own voice are said to accompany themselves with a (musical instrument). If you say it this way your meaning will not be unclear.
    Yes, Robert, I know but I would like to ask Falcons about "accompany" with another meaning: Accompany is to go along with.
    With this meaning is my sentence right?
    Thanks.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Yes, Robert, I know but I would like to ask Falcons about "accompany" with another meaning: Accompany is to go along with.
    With this meaning is my sentence right?
    Thanks.
    Yes it is correct.
    It uses accompany in the sense of 'to occur, coexist or be associated with'.

    .,,
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thanks.
    They include "go along with somebody", don't they?
    Can you give me an example with the meaning of occur?
    Is it right? "An accident accompanied last night (occur)
    Thanks.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Mimi,
    I may be wrong but I think that you should start another thread for occur or you are likely to be confused by the association with accompany.

    An accident accompanied last night makes no real sense. The accident did not exist just because last night existed.
    .,,
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Of course one accompanies oneself on the piano/guitar/spoonb etc. when singing.

    A song is "accompanied" when there is music with it.
    If X is going to sing and Y is going to play the music, then Y accompanies X.
    If X is going to sing and play, then they accompany themselves.
     
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