According to the picture [a drumstick/ a chicken leg?]

  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "Piece of chicken" — most general statement, correct, but not the most usual term for this particular piece.
    "Chicken leg" and "drumstick" both apply. A more precise description.
    All three can be used correctly here.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    That's a drumstick.

    A chicken leg is a drumstick and thigh.


    Rover
    That is a useful distinction, but I have to say that it's not one I've ever heard before. I use drumstick and chicken leg interchangeably. I thought everyone did, but it appears I'm wrong about that. I don't think I'm wrong in saying that the distinction you make, Rover, isn't made by everybody.
     
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    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Once the chicken has been prepared for eating, I agree with JustKate: the terms are interchangeable in practice. Until then, however, it's only a chicken leg. It's not a drumstick while the chicken is still walking around on it.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Until then, however, it's only a chicken leg. It's not a drumstick while the chicken is still walking around on it.
    I think that's still an idiomatic usage. As Rover_KE points out, while the chicken is walking around on it, the "drumstick" is just the equivalent to the human calf and the thigh is also part of the leg. I think the shank (the featherless part between the small end of the drumstick and the ground) is anatomically part of the foot, but it looks like "leg" to me. :)
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I agree with Rover. The picture shows a drumstick, which is the 'bottom half' of a chicken leg.
    Obviously it's yet another AE/BrE difference.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I don't know about "obviously." I don't think Cyberpedant, Myridon and I can be considered representative of the entire population of the U.S. We may be, but then again, we may not. I have until now never even considered whether there is any difference in meaning between drumstick and chicken leg, and I may have missed something.
     

    Rejci

    Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't know about "obviously." I don't think Cyberpedant, Myridon and I can be considered representative of the entire population of the U.S. We may be, but then again, we may not. I have until now never even considered whether there is any difference in meaning between drumstick and chicken leg, and I may have missed something.
    Well, you can count me in as another person from the U.S. who has never heard this distinction.

    I think Bevj is probably right. It must be different between the U.S. and the U.K.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I'm familiar with the term 'drumstick,' but it's been my experience that almost all AE speakers would call it a 'leg.'
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I use both 'leg' and 'drumstick'. No real rhyme or reason.

    If I was at a restaurant and either 'leg' or 'drumstick' was listed, I'd have no problem readily identifying what I was ordering.

    There may be a BrE/AmE distinction, but I'd use either/or depending on how the mood struck me.

    I must say though, I would not call it a 'drumstick' while it's still on a living chicken; only the dead kind that I intend to eat. ;)
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I must say though, I would not call it a 'drumstick' while it's still on a living chicken; only the dead kind that I intend to eat. ;)
    Definitely. The drumstick is what you prepare, serve and eat, not what the chicken or turkey walks around on.

    I use drumstick and leg interchangeably as well. I'm not even sure which one I use most often.
     
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    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    When I was a kid, the leg was served intact - thigh and lower leg as one single piece. The term "drumstick" had me totally baffled, as a "leg" looked more like an axe than a drumstick....
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    When I was a kid, the leg was served intact - thigh and lower leg as one single piece. The term "drumstick" had me totally baffled, as a "leg" looked more like an axe than a drumstick....
    I could see this in perhaps a sit-down restaurant. But, I can assure you, if you walk into KFC or Popeye's, that would not be the kind of 'leg' you'd be served. ;)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I could see this in perhaps a sit-down restaurant. But, I can assure you, if you walk into KFC or Popeye's, that would not be the kind of 'leg' you'd be served. ;)
    Indeed. But while I don't know about Popeye's, at KFC you would indeed be served a "leg," not a "drumstick."

    (Actually, I was referring to meals at home, not in restaurants.)
     
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