Account balance

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bluesky-hl

New Member
US
Chinese
There are not enough funds in my account. How should I describe the situation? Can I say my account balance is insufficient? Or my bank balance isn't very large? What is you opinion? Thanks!
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's a difference between being insufficient and not being very large.

    The font you have chosen isn't very large, but it is just sufficiently large for me to see without a magnifying glass.

    You say there aren't enough funds in your account. The word enough implies that they are insufficient for some purpose, so:

    My account balance is insufficient:tick:
    My bank balance isn't very large - the English is fine, but it doesn't mean what you say you want it to mean.
     

    nizarm3allem

    Senior Member
    arabic
    I agree with Thomas, and note that account balance is used in accounting for all accounts so you have to say bank balance. note that when the balance is debitor in accounting balance it is bank account and when it is creditor it is overdraft.
    I am telling you that because you should specify that you are telling that it is not sufficient from bank statement for example.
     
    I agree with Thomas Tompion but wanted to make clear that you must explain what the balance is insufficient for. You can't say, in isolation:

    I am low on funds. My bank balance is insufficient.

    You would have to say something like:

    I can't join you on this trip. I'm low on money right now, and my bank balance is insufficient to cover the cost [of the trip].

    You might also need to know that "insufficient funds" is the standard AE banking term for an overdrawn checking [current] account. When an AE speaker hears "insufficient funds," he will automatically picture a check with "NSF" (banking jargon for "insufficient funds") stamped on it - the mark of a "bounced check," which is definitely not a good thing. These days, there are very few paper checks, but the image lingers on, so you might want to be careful about using the phrase.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I would say the commonest way of saying this is:
    There are insufficient funds in my account (or There aren't enough funds in my account, as you said first).

    Why talk about balances?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    There are not enough funds in my account. How should I describe the situation? Can I say my account balance is insufficient? Or my bank balance isn't very large? What is you opinion? Thanks!
    Welcome to the forumes, bluesky-hi!

    Please tell us more about what you mean when you say that "there are not enough funds in my account". Do you mean that your account does not have enough funds to pay the checks you have already written, or not enough for some spending you would like to do?

    In AE (American English) you have quite a few choices. [Note that BE, or British English, uses different terms for some of these things.]

    If your account is a checking account, and you have written checks for more than your account balance, then you would say:

    I don't (or possibly "My account doesn't" ) have enough money in my account.

    Your bank might say of the same situation:

    The account has insufficient funds. It is in overdraught condition.


    If you are talking about not having enough money in a bank account or brokerage account to do something you want to do, then you might say:

    I haven't enough in my account to cover it. ["It" would be whatever you need money for.]
     

    nizarm3allem

    Senior Member
    arabic
    But they are also used in the banking context, Nizarm. It's not unusual, for instance, to ask one's bank for one's current account balance. If you ask them how much you've got in your current account, you are implying that it is not overdrawn.
    The balance shows how much you have so you can't say for example: There are insufficient funds in my account balance or There aren't enough funds in my account balance. Because funds and balance shows how much money you have so your title of the thread is not correct. and that is why e2efour told why talk about balances.
    hope that help :)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Cuchu's spelling is usually reliable, unlike mine, but I wonder about overdraught.

    In BE banking we have overdrafts, and this dictionary suggests that an overdraught is a current of air passing over a furnace.
    Thanks Thomas. My usually dicey spelling has made yet another appearance. You are correct, and I was wrong. It should be overdraft. That will teach me to post before my morning coffee. [Coffee doesn't cure my awful spelling, but it's a plausible excuse.]
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The balance shows how much you have so you can't say for example: There are insufficient funds in my account balance or There aren't enough funds in my account balance. Because funds and balance shows how much money you have so your title of the thread is not correct. and that is why e2efour told why talk about balances.
    hope that help :)
    The title of the thread just says account balance, Nizarm. You say this is not correct, but I'm afraid I can't see anything inherently absurd or incorrect about these words alongside each other.

    Notice that Cuchuflete said, without an apparent blush (in post 8), If your account is a checking account, and you have written checks for more than your account balance,... and I would not take issue with that form of words.
     

    nizarm3allem

    Senior Member
    arabic
    it should be "bank balance" not "account balance" because account balance can be used in all accounts in accounting for example the the account balance of staff advance is x$ the account balance of billing is Y$... you are talking about bank account balance it is a specific but your title is general. I am an accountant so that is why the first time I read the title and then read the thread I found that the title didn't tie with the thread.
     
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