accusations by one side or the other 'by' [?] corruption

yjhjerry

Senior Member
Chinese
"They may have passed what they said back in 2007, [but] how many changes of government have happened since 2007 because accusations by one side or the other by corruption? That has nothing to do with the magnitude. This has to do with corruption as an issue that can force political change and that is what investors care about," he said.
It's about Thailand's official corruption, and it comes from special VOA. there are two "by"s, which I have capitalized. It seems to me that the second "by" is incorrectly used. As a alternative, I would prefer "because of" or "due to" in the given context.

Am I right? Thanks in advance!
 
  • rcottere

    Member
    English - American (East Coast)
    You are correct. "to accuse someone of something". Never due to though. It should be noted that you did not capitalize the grammatical examples, but bolded them.
     

    yjhjerry

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks, rocttere. You mean I can rewrite the sentence as:
    how many changes of government have happened since 2007 because of accusations by one side or the other of corruption
    ?
     

    alaethea

    Senior Member
    India-Tamil & English
    Another note.
    "due to" can be only used with an "adjectival" sense.
    Never substitute "because of" or "owing" to with "due to"
     

    rcottere

    Member
    English - American (East Coast)
    Another note.
    "due to" can be only used with an "adjectival" sense.
    Never substitute "because of" or "owing" to with "due to"
    The plane was grounded because of inclement weather.
    The plane was grounded due to inclement weather.

    Why can't you substitute "because of" for "due to" exactly? I don't know you mean by an "adjectival" sense.
     

    yjhjerry

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello, rcottere. Could you please help me recheck my sentence:
    how many changes of government have happened since 2007 because of accusations by one side or the other of corruption
    ?

    Thank you
     

    rcottere

    Member
    English - American (East Coast)
    I would say:

    "How many changes in government have occured since 2007 because of accusations by one side or the other of corruption?"

    changes in government seems more natural to me, as does occur.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    If Thailand has a parliamentary system, I would use "changes of government". Yjhjerry, I think you are using the prepositions properly now. :thumbsup:
     

    alaethea

    Senior Member
    India-Tamil & English
    Why can't you substitute "because of" for "due to" exactly? I don't know you mean by an "adjectival" sense.
    It's generally not accepted, although conventionally many writers fall into this error.

    1) "due" is an adjective
    It's generally used predicatively as : to be + due
    2) "Because of"and "owing to" are not used so.

    Consider this:
    He was tired due to hours of heavy work. :cross:

    He was tired owing to / because of hours of heavy work. :tick:


    because of/ owing to can be used to construct prepositional phrases and are themselves compound prepositions.

    "due to" isn't.

    The correct usage of "due to" is as follows

    His tiredness was due to hours of heavy work.

    Or better,
    It was due to hours of heavy work that he was tired.

    Further clarification may be obtained if you question yourself "What is due?"

    Here, tiredness is due (appropriate, fitting)

    He was tired due to hours of heavy work. :cross:
    Here the same question wouldn't work as it doesn't answer "What is due?"

    Hope I've answered your question:)
     

    rcottere

    Member
    English - American (East Coast)
    Well..

    "He was tired due to hours of heavy work" sounds fine to me. I just checked the dictionary and it defined "due to" as meaning "because of" and "owning to". So...maybe it's a distinction that has been lost in American English.
     

    rcottere

    Member
    English - American (East Coast)
    Well...I was curious. It's quite possible that there's a difference I'm unaware of. English has many dialects :p I didn't mean to hassle you.
     
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