'Ace' used as interjection

AlexAbis

New Member
Italiano
Context: Character A wishes to obtain a ticket for a show, but it's sold out. Character B gifts A a ticket to said show. A replies:

"Ace! How can I thank you?”

Character A, mind you, is meant to be born and grown in the U.S.A. If it makes any difference, since it's slang, he's about 40 y.o. and the events take place in 2014.

Now, my questions:
1) I found that "ace" with the meaning of "excellent" is mainly a British thing, and outdated too [source 1] [source 2]; although other sources (e.g. Urban Dictionary--I know, not the most reliable of sources) seem to contradict this. So, how likely is a U.S. character to use it that way?
2) Also, in that meaning "ace" is an adjective rather than an interjection--though other adjectives, e.g. "great", are commonly used as interjections in a similar fashion. So, do you think that the use of "ace" as interjection is legitimate?
3) I really like the use of "ace" as an interjection there, because (to me, at least) it works both as "awesome" and as a compliment towards his friend B, like "(you are) ace"--kind of "you're the best". Is it just me, or such a nuance in the meaning of "ace" used as an interjection in that context could be caught by American readers too?
 
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  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm English, so I can only answer 2): I think it's certainly legitimate (What isn't?), but I find it rather outdated and maybe juvenile - the language of 10-year-olds - rather than natural among adults.
     

    AlexAbis

    New Member
    Italiano
    I'm English, so I can only answer 2): I think it's certainly legitimate (What isn't?), but I find it rather outdated and maybe juvenile - the language of 10-year-olds - rather than natural among adults.
    I see. Thank you for your feedback. Well, I've heard adults using slang words from their youth without much thought, under the right circumstances, so that wouldn't be much of a concern :) Still something to ponder on.

    I'd still like to receive replies from U.S. dwellers.
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't hear anybody saying that but it's understandable in the context. It's the equivalent of great. I don't think it has any extra meaning.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I don't hear anybody saying that but it's understandable in the context. It's the equivalent of great. I don't think it has any extra meaning.
    I agree, but I would expect "aces" and not "ace".

    Historical note: "Ace" used to mean a one dollar bill somewhere in the early 1900s.
     
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