ache with ambition

Annakrutitskaya

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!

John Hurston, however, ached with ambition. (Valerie Boyd, Wrapped in Rainbows)

1) Is it usual to use preposition 'with' after the verb 'to ache'? Why is it used in this way? Does this phrase has a negative sense?

2) Does this sentence mean that:

- John's ambition was too strong for him and he couldn't endure it, or
- he was absolutely preoccupied with ambition such that it looked unhealthy, abnormal, etc?

Thank you!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Sometimes you ache with things in the literal (painful) sense - ache with pain or tension, ache with the effort of lifting a heavy box, ache with keeping your hands in position for a long time. Often it's used with emotions - ache with disappointment or grief - or generally positive emotions with some negative impact - ache with longing or desire. The object is quite achievable; it doesn't mean the ambition is too much for him, or is not attained, but that it is somehow painful or perhaps 'tense' to keep it up.
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Sometimes you ache with things in the literal (painful) sense - ache with pain or tension, ache with the effort of lifting a heavy box, ache with keeping your hands in position for a long time. Often it's used with emotions - ache with disappointment or grief - or generally positive emotions with some negative impact - ache with longing or desire. The object is quite achievable; it doesn't mean the ambition is too much for him, or is not attained, but that it is somehow painful or perhaps 'tense' to keep it up.
    Thank you very much - very helpful explanation! :)
     
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