achever ma carrière sur un réveil

  • guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    Assuming it's a doctor who is retiring, the réveil needs explaining, perhaps he is setting an alarm for 18.00 when he finally signs off.
    But without context for the "alarm" or "wake-up call", it isn't clear at all. Sorry!
     

    joelooc

    Senior Member
    French (Provence)
    Clearly, when a patient doesn't regain counsciousness you can't call it a success.
     
    I am sorry I should have included my attempt, which is:-
    You are my last patient, I am happy to finish my career on time ( just at the right time!)
    Context
    This is a doctor talking to a patient who has just woken from a coma. It is from a book I am trying to read called "La femme au carnet rouge "
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    In English, it would be "I'm very pleased to be able to finish my career like this. You are my last patient and you've woken up from your coma!"
    However the French is not clear without explanation of "un réveil" meaning "a waking-up" (from unconsciousness) of his last patient in his working life. The "un" has no meaning without a reference!!
     

    joelooc

    Senior Member
    French (Provence)
    "You are my last patient and I'm glad you came to as a final point to my career."
    How would this work?
     

    c_zenii

    Senior Member
    French
    "I'm glad to end my career now that your eyes are open"

    However the French is not clear without explanation of "un réveil" meaning "a waking-up" (from unconsciousness) of his last patient in his working life.
    Well in context (medical) , "un réveil" definitely has a connotation.
    Obviously, if you're talking to your GP, it may be confusing but if you're talking to A&E/ER staff, I don't believe anyone would have an interrupted nap in mind :p

    "Réveil" usually comes after a coma or a general anaesthesia. Else, I'd use "reprendre au conscience".
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm happy to finish my career [on a high note,] just as you are waking up/starting your recovery?
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    « La femme au carnet rouge » was translated under the title "The Red Noteook". I can't say that I'm impressed as I'm sure there are better solutions...
    but for anyone interested, this is how the translators (Jane Aitken and Emily Boyce) rendered the sentence (coloring mine) :
    ‘I believe you,’ he said, placing his hand on Laure’s. ‘You’re my last patient. Your waking up is a good note to end my career on.’
    Source - direct link to the right page.
    And this link is where the book begins - with "next page" link at the bottom. :)
     
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    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    :thumbsup::tick: certainly the best choice; though I would put a hyphen "waking-up" to show it is a noun ("réveil").

    EOD, IMHO. NOI, Nico, that was a good choice to end with!!;):) - Type "Lexicon SMS" for explanation of modern SMS/text acronyms in English - as discussed in the forum thread JPP in French.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    I personally prefer "awakening" to a hyphened "waking-up", for a noun related to coma.
    Otherwise, I'd leave it as a verb.
     
    Last edited:

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    I personally prefer "awakening" to a hyphened "waking-up", for a noun related to coma.
    Otherwise, I'd leave it as a verb.
    Yes; or as suggested earlier "coming round" (from a coma); if waking-up is hyphenated, it would be used with "from a coma" to explain the different use of awakening from the everyday use of "waking up in the morning".
     
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