achieve perspective through the sublime and the transcendent

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Rigardo Lee

Senior Member
Source and context :

It has been the purpose of this book to identify some of the lessons we might retrieve from religions: how to generate feelings of community, how to promote kindness, how to cancel out the current bias towards commercial values in advertising, how to select and make use of secular saints, how to rethink the strategies of universities and our approach to cultural education, how to redesign hotels and spas, how better to acknowledge our own childlike needs, how to surrender some of our counterproductive optimism, how to achieve perspective through the sublime and the transcendent,

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Hi there.

I hope you are all having a good day.

This is from my book 'Religion for Atheists'.

Here are the questions:

I'm wondering what the author meant by using 'perspective' in UC form and how it influences the overall connotation.

Uncountable 'perspective' comes across as somewhat more of an art technique, not in ways we usually expect it to sound like 'viewpoint or opinion'.

Besides, I suppose the writer could've done better if he expressed more clearly what 'the sublime and the transcendent' exactly is.

I still have a grammar doubt about what the two adjectives of 'sublime and transcendent' represent. It's just too comprehensive use of definite article 'the'.
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    in UC form
    What's that? Do you mean "uncountable"?
    Uncountable 'perspective' comes across as somewhat more of an art technique, not in ways we usually expect it to sound like 'viewpoint or opinion'.
    It's not a particular perspective on a particular situation, but something more abstract.
    You seem to be quoting "art technique" and "viewpoint" from a dictionary, perhaps (1) and (3) from here: perspective - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    You want instead (4), "the ability to see the important facts of something in proportion to one another".

    "Sublime" and "transcendent" are not adjectives, they are nouns (that they have "the" in front of them is a strong hint), again denoting abstract concepts.
    Here the idea is that the sublime and the transcendent will help us to achieve perspective.
     

    Rigardo Lee

    Senior Member
    What's that? Do you mean "uncountable"?

    It's not a particular perspective on a particular situation, but something more abstract.
    You seem to be quoting "art technique" and "viewpoint" from a dictionary, perhaps (1) and (3) from here: perspective - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    You want instead (4), "the ability to see the important facts of something in proportion to one another".

    "Sublime" and "transcendent" are not adjectives, they are nouns (that they have "the" in front of them is a strong hint), again denoting abstract concepts.
    Here the idea is that the sublime and the transcendent will help us to achieve perspective.
    First thanks a lot for your immediate, yet well organized help.
    Sorry for that confusion.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To see something "in perspective" means to view it not in isolation but in relationship to all the other factors that affect it. For example, people who have so serious an accident or illness that they nearly die often say that the experience has put everything into perspective and completely changed the way their view their life.

    The words sublime (awe-inspiring/beautiful) and transcendent (beyond normal human experience) are both strongly associated with religion and spiritual matters — unlike the more mundane matters listed before them in your quote. The article "the" before them denotes that they are being used here to represent all things that are sublime or transcendent. (As in the expression, describing something that's been turned on its head, that it has gone "from the sublime to the ridiculous".)
     

    Rigardo Lee

    Senior Member
    To see something "in perspective" means to view it not in isolation but in relationship to all the other factors that affect it. For example, people who have so serious an accident or illness that they nearly die often say that the experience has put everything into perspective and completely changed the way their view their life.

    The words sublime (awe-inspiring/beautiful) and transcendent (beyond normal human experience) are both strongly associated with religion and spiritual matters — unlike the more mundane matters listed before them in your quote. The article "the" before them denotes that they are being used here to represent all things that are sublime or transcendent. (As in the expression, describing something that's been turned on its head, that it has gone "from the sublime to the ridiculous".)
    I see your point, with your practical 'sublime' expression at the end of your answer.
     
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