aching legs

Dr.Appalayya

Senior Member
India;Telugu
If one stands longer like for four hours without ever having the chance to sit in between, his legs must be paining. I want to describe those legs. Can I say,

His legs must be aching..(Let us offer him seat)..His legs must be paining..
 
  • AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    If one stands longer like for four hours without ever having the chance to sit in between, his legs must be paining. I want to describe those legs. Can I say,

    His legs must be aching..(Let us offer him seat)..His legs must be paining..

    1. His legs must be hurting. Let's offer him a seat.


    This one's very casual AE, and the one you'd hear the most:

    2. His legs must be killing him. Let's offer the poor guy a seat.

    An even more common way of saying it:

    3. His feet must be killing him. Let's offer the poor guy a seat.

    Americans' feet are always bothering them. You hear this expression all the time. Much more than mentioning someone's legs.



    AngelEyes
     

    pyan

    Senior Member
    English, UK, London
    AngelEye's informal American English expressions would be used in exactly the same way in British English. (It is pleasant to be able to write this - forer@s spend much energy pointing out the few differences.)

    I would not use: "His legs must be paining him." I would use: "His legs must be aching."

    "To pain" as a verb is almost always used in the sense of to irritate, to annoy or to cause grief.
     

    gregitaliano

    Senior Member
    england
    If I stand longer than four hours without sitting down, my legs start to hurt/ my legs start to ache/ my legs start to bother me/ I develop pains in my legs/ my legs start to kill me (colloquial)

    Greg
     
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