acosar / hostigar

  • belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    Hola Pilar,

    Lo único que se me ocurre es poner las definiciones de ambas palabras, que, aún similares, presentan leves diferencias:

    hostigar.
    (Del lat. fustigāre).
    1. tr. Dar golpes con una fusta, un látigo u otro instrumento, para hacer mover, juntar o dispersar.
    2. tr. Molestar a alguien o burlarse de él insistentemente.
    3. tr. Incitar con insistencia a alguien para que haga algo.
    4. tr. hostilizar (ǁ al enemigo).
    5. intr. And., Chile, Col., Ecuad., Méx. y Perú. Dicho de un alimento o de una bebida: Ser empalagoso.
    6. intr. coloq. Bol., Chile, Col. y Perú. Dicho de una persona: Ser molesta o empalagosa.

    acosar.
    (Del ant. cosso, carrera).
    1. tr. Perseguir, sin darle tregua ni reposo, a un animal o a una persona.
    2. tr. Hacer correr al caballo.
    3. tr. Perseguir, apremiar, importunar a alguien con molestias o requerimientos.

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    Pilar Astor said:
    I have a cuestion about two words in Spanish. acosar and hostigar.
    Does anyone know if they mean the same thing, or is there any difference in meaning?
    Acosar = to hound someone, to relentlessly pursue him/her, to go after a person. Taken to the extreme, it becomes stalking. In some instances, it is also to harass.

    Hostigar = to harass someone, to bother, to pester

    Saludos,
    LN
     

    manana

    Senior Member
    Chile - Español
    Hola:

    Hostigar is near to pester and to irritate but it depends on the context.
    "Acosar" is nearest to pursue and to chase than "hostigar". In Chile acosar is used in a sexual context like "sexual harassment" "acoso sexual".

    Excuse my Inglish because is so bad.

    Manana
     

    belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    In Spain at least, "acoso sexual" is used for "sexual harassment" and "acoso laboral" for "mobbing"
     

    manana

    Senior Member
    Chile - Español
    In Chile “acoso” is better for “sexual harassment” but hostigar could be too. For me “acoso” is a perfect spanish synonymous for sexual harassment. I think that there are slights and subtles diferences from one country to another.


    Please correct me if my Inglish is wrong. Thanks.
     

    rayb

    Senior Member
    Chile - Spanish
    Pilar Astor said:
    Is acoso a better word for sexual harassment? Could hostigar be used in that context?
    Thanks,
    Pilar
    "hostigar" for sexual harassment? In Chile, "hostigar" could even meanthe opposite. "Me hostigö", for example is said when you are plenty of a food or a person, also if you find them too sweet. However, this meaning may be the result of a long time harassement or mobbing.
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In Spain, when you use hostigar you are not implying any sexual connotation at all. When you use acosar, provided that the context is clear, the sexual connotation can be implicit; however, you can use acosar to refer to situations where no sexual harassment is involved, as in mobbing.

    Saludos.
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    Pilar Astor said:
    Is acoso a better word for sexual harassment? Could hostigar be used in that context?
    In Puerto Rico, we say hostigamiento sexual for sexual harassment. "Acoso" is hardly (if not at all) used in that context over here.
    Hope that helps.

    Saludos,
    LN
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    lauranazario said:
    In Puerto Rico, we say hostigamiento sexual for sexual harassment. "Acoso" is hardly (if not at all) used in that context over here.
    Hope that helps.

    Saludos,
    LN
    Good to know, Lauranazario, it is so different here in Spain! :p
     

    ENRIQUE GARCIA RAMIREZ

    New Member
    MEXICO, SPANISH
    Pilar Astor said:
    I have a cuestion about two words in Spanish. acosar and hostigar.
    Does anyone know if they mean the same thing, or is there any difference in meaning?
    Thak you.
    Pilar
    I guess they are possible to be used like synonymous one of the other (meaning=to bother or even to molest). However, acosar is more like chasing, and hostigar is more like beating to obligate. Hope be useful...
     

    UltiMATE jugador

    Senior Member
    English-US (New Jersey)
    ¿"hostigar" o "acosar" para "harass" cuando.....

    1-Los policías "harass" a alguien....?

    2-Los alumnos en el instituto "harass" a otro alumno por ser diferente, etc....?
    ¿y los sustantivos para 1 & 2 serían "acoso/hostigamiento policiaco" y "acoso/hostigamiento estudiantil"?
     

    Alisterio

    Senior Member
    UK English
    ¿"hostigar" o "acosar" para "harass" cuando.....

    1-Los policías "harass" a alguien....?

    2-Los alumnos en el instituto "harass" a otro alumno por ser diferente, etc....?
    ¿y los sustantivos para 1 & 2 serían "acoso/hostigamiento policiaco" y "acoso/hostigamiento estudiantil"?
    Personally I use both of these words interchangeably, and yes, the noun forms are acoso/hostigamiento policiaco [or policial] and acoso/hostigamiento estudiantil.
     

    Siltha

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I don't think hostigar is necessarily negative, at least in Spain. It comes from hitting the horses/donkeys, etc. with a riding crop to make them move forward. When you use it like "3. tr. Incitar con insistencia a alguien para que haga algo. " it may imply that one person wants some other person to do something specific and it's being a pain in the ass to that person, but it is not necessarily negative. In the other hand, acosar is more targeted to a specific person.

    ¿"hostigar" o "acosar" para "harass" cuando.....

    1-Los policías "harass" a alguien....?

    2-Los alumnos en el instituto "harass" a otro alumno por ser diferente, etc....?
    ¿y los sustantivos para 1 & 2 serían "acoso/hostigamiento policiaco" y "acoso/hostigamiento estudiantil"?
    Talking about how would I use these words in Spain:
    In situation 1 it depends on what's the specific situation are you trying to describe. Hostigamiento policial, for me, would be police hitting people in a demonstration so they disperse, and acoso policial would be if some police officers were targeting a particular person or group. Also, acoso policial would also imply for me that it is something they are doing not related to their duty, but probably abusing their power, while hostigamiento could be bordering their line of duty but not out of it completely.

    In 2 I would say acoso, as it is targeted to one specific student for being different.

    Please, feel free to correct me if you think I may be wrong or to comment!
     
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