Acqua alla gola

Elisa68

Senior Member
Italian
Ciao ragazzi!

C'è un'espressione equivalente in inglese per dire:
avere l'acqua alla gola-->Avere poco tempo a disposizione per completare qualcosa (ad esempio un assignment)?

Come al solito, grazie mille!:)
 
  • moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    Elisa68 said:
    Ciao ragazzi!

    C'è un'espressione equivalente in inglese per dire:
    avere l'acqua alla gola-->Avere poco tempo a disposizione per completare qualcosa (ad esempio un assignment)?

    Come al solito, grazie mille!:)
    In genere si traduce be in deep water ma forse nell'esempio che hai fatto tu potrebbe andar bene semplicemente I'm running out of time. Sono sicuro che i madrelingua troveranno una frase più idiomatica
     
    moodywop said:
    In genere si traduce be in deep water ma forse nell'esempio che hai fatto tu potrebbe andar bene semplicemente I'm running out of time. Sono sicuro che i madrelingua troveranno una frase più idiomatica
    We also say "sinking fast" and "up the creek [in a canoe] without a paddle." Slightly vulgar is "up to one's ass in alligators." A similar useage is when one is "treading water," but this means the same as "just hanging on" or staying in one place in the midst of an unfortunate situation, but without making any progress.
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    You can say "it's crunch time for me", meaning it's a critical period for you because you're running out of time and have to perform; similarly, you can say "i'm in a time crunch".

    If your boss (or client) is pressuring you to do something and you're racing to finish to keep him/her happy, you say "my boss is breathing down my neck."

    Interestingly, vis. a vis. "avere acqua alla gola", if you say in English that you are "drowning" in work, it means you have too much work, but doesn't say anything about the time you have to get it done.

    Being in deep water/being in over your head mean that you are overwhelmed or in trouble, but again don't really speak to the amount of time you have to deal with the issue.
     

    DAH

    Senior Member
    USA/California--English
    diciamo in inglese (AE) to be choked-up (a feeling one has in the throat, like a lump, that is casued by some unique circumstances or about someone). se capisco che tu dica.
     

    Elisa68

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Grazie a tutti!

    DAH, credo ti riferisca ad:
    avere un groppo in gola
    che ha il significato descritto da te; tuttavia è diverso da avere l'acqua alla gola.;)
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Marcone said:
    Up to my neck-meaning if it gets any deeper I'll drown. I have to finish NOW!
    also common: "up to my ears," and "up to my eyeballs." (We're a busy bunch, lots of ways to say too much to do :D)
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    lsp said:
    We're a busy bunch, lots of ways to say too much to do :D
    It certainly seems so. I don't think any other Italian idiom has ever elicited such a variety of equivalent expressions in English(thirteen so far!).

    I use avere l'acqua alla gola in the context Elisa suggested, e.g. when a deadline is approaching or if the bills are piling up and the money is running out. That's why I was surprised to see that the Palazzi-Folena defines it as essere in grave pericolo. Do any of the other Italians use it in this more general sense?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I think Manuel's racing against time translates it quite well. When you're trying to say that you need to finish something quickly, you could say, It's a race against time.
     

    pessa1661

    Member
    USA English
    Cosa vuol dire "acqua alla gola" Ho letto dalla frase: E nelle manifestazioni io vedo sempre piu` padri e madri di figli in braccio e l'acqua alla gola.
     

    Salegrosso

    Senior Member
    Verona (Italy)
    Acqua alla gola, in this sentence, means: with very few money, that is, in dire straits, having difficulties to find money for the needs of everyday.

    In general, it is referred not only to money: for example, you can avere l'acqua alla gola when you have a hard deadline and too much work to do.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Be in deep water (from TheFreeDictionary)
    to be in a difficult situation which is hard to deal with, according to Salegrosso's explanation (part 1).
    I don't think this really corresponds. "To be in deep water" means more generally "essere nei guai", while "acqua alla gola" (water up to their necks, implying that it will soon be over their heads) gives more the idea of a final crisis point:
    Non aspettare fino ad avere l'acqua alla gola prima di agire.
    Tipicamente uno può avere tutto il tempo che gli serve, ma si mette a lavorare solo quando ha l'acqua alla gola.
     

    giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    I don't think this really corresponds. "To be in deep water" means more generally "essere nei guai", while "acqua alla gola" (water up to their necks, implying that it will soon be over their heads) gives more the idea of a final crisis point:
    Non aspettare fino ad avere l'acqua alla gola prima di agire.
    Tipicamente uno può avere tutto il tempo che gli serve, ma si mette a lavorare solo quando ha l'acqua alla gola.
    Good point! But how would you say it in English? Garzanti gives "up to one's neck in it" but to me "avere l'acqua alla gola" sounds more dramatic somehow, at least in certain contexts.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hmmm... Yes, Giovannino, you're right; "up to one's neck in it" doesn't give the same idea as "acqua alla gola", which implies a rising level! I'm still thinking about it; what about "at the end of one's tether" (in the example given at the beginning, not in general)?
     

    underhouse

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Good point! But how would you say it in English? Garzanti gives "up to one's neck in it" but to me "avere l'acqua alla gola" sounds more dramatic somehow, at least in certain contexts.
    Questo è il punto, giovannino!
    Uno può avere l'acqua alla gola perchè, ad esempio, al lavoro ha difficoltà a star dietro a tutti gli impegni e a far fronte a tutte le scadenze, oppure, altro esempio, perchè con il proprio reddito non riesce ad arrivare alla fine del mese.
    Io penso che, nell'inglese di tutti giorni, si possa tradurre con un generico "to be in trouble".
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Dire straits? Yes, I suppose so, but we still have to distinguish between the generally bad situation as expressed by "in deep water" and the imminent crisis of "acqua alla gola". I'm not sure which category "dire straits" fits into!
     
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