across the aisle

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TanyaMti

Member
Chinese
Hi forum members,
What does across the aisle mean? It's from a piece of news.(http://www.economist.com/news/leade...de&spv=xm&ah=9d7f7ab945510a56fa6d37c30b6f1709)


He has no Clintonian record of reaching across the aisle. And the central issue that divides the parties—how to solve the American government’s rotten finances—was the weak spot both of Mr Obama’s first term (he ignored the recommendations of his own Bowles-Simpson deficit commission) and of his campaign (he simply concentrated on hammering away at Mr Romney’s admittedly barmy numbers).

Thanks in advance. :)
 
  • lennny

    Member
    Cantonese
    i read an article on it. i can't post the link to you cus i'm a new member. it mostly applies to politics. the 'aisle' refers to the ideological differences between parties. reaching across the aisle means politicians are compromising with other parties so that e.g. legislation can be written.
     

    TanyaMti

    Member
    Chinese
    i read an article on it. i can't post the link to you cus i'm a new member. it mostly applies to politics. the 'aisle' refers to the ideological differences between parties. reaching across the aisle means politicians are compromising with other parties so that e.g. legislation can be written.
    Thanks lennny!
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The reference it to a traditional physical feature of parliaments and similar legislative assemblies. In these the chairman or "speaker" has a chair at one end of the room, conservative parties, or supporters of the government, sit towards the wall to his right; progressive parties, or the opposition, sit towards the wall to the left. Between these groups of members is a space, referred to in America as the "aisle". In Westminster it is more often called the "floor of the house". http://www.thecapitol.net/FAQ/Congress_Seating.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left-right_politics
     
    Last edited:

    TanyaMti

    Member
    Chinese
    The reference it to a traditional physical feature of parliaments and similar legislative assemblies. In these the chairman or "speaker" has a chair at one end of the room, conservative parties, or supporters of the government, sit towards the wall to his right; progressive parties, or the opposition, sit towards the wall to the left. Between these groups of members is a space, referred to in America as the "aisle". In Westminster it is more often called the "floor of the house". http://www.thecapitol.net/FAQ/Congress_Seating.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left-right_politics
    Thank you so much, Se16teddy!
     
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