Across the corridor from theirs

El hombre de las dudas

Senior Member
Mexican Spanish
I came across the following sentence in a book: "Reilly started staying in hotel rooms just across the corridor from theirs."

It's the "across the corridor from theirs" part that confuses me. What does it mean by "theirs"? Their rooms? If so, is that construction correct?
 
  • dadane

    Senior Member
    English (London/Essex)
    But isn't the inclusion of "corridor" in the middle of the sentence somewhat confusing? It seems to imply that what is theirs is the corridor rather than the rooms.
    Not really. "Just across the corridor" is an adjectival phrase describing the relative positions, 'corridor' is an integral part of that phrase so it can't be considered separately from 'just across the'. Just substitute the whole phrase with the single word 'opposite' and you should see what I mean.
     
    hombre, as dadane said, that's not a possible reading of

    Jack and Jill are staying at the Hilton. Reilly occupies the rooms across the corridor from theirs.

    We are talking of *rooms*. The sentence would have to be drasticaly altered for your idea to apply.

    Jack and Jill occupy rooms at the Hilton, off the north corridor. Reilly's rooms are on a corridor perpendicular to theirs.
     

    El hombre de las dudas

    Senior Member
    Mexican Spanish
    So, just to make sure I got the concept, would it be ok to say "The couple lives on the house across the street from mine"? Would it be right to say "The couple lives on the house across the street"? The relationship between across and from ​in this context confuses me.
     
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    El hombre de las dudas

    Senior Member
    Mexican Spanish
    Ok, I think I'm getting it. Just one more thing. Across from is then a grammatical category (I take it one analogous to a preposition; a prepositional locution, perhaps?) which can be used either alone or with a noun between both words?
     

    dadane

    Senior Member
    English (London/Essex)
    So, just to make sure I got the concept, would it be ok to say "The couple lives on the house across the street from mine"? Would it be right to say "The couple lives on the house across the street"? The relationship between across and from ​in this context confuses me.
    "The couple lives in the house across the street". - Yes, you can use this if their house is across the street from where you are standing or from a house on the other side of the street.

    If you wished to say they were across the street from somebody else's house you would have to specify which house (e.g. "The couple lived in the house across the street from theirs"). Also, if you were at a friend's house and were talking about your neighbours rather than theirs you would usually specify (e.g. "The couple lived in the house across the street from ours").

    PS. I deleted previous post, because I realised I started with a special case which will just confuse the issue.
     
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    dadane

    Senior Member
    English (London/Essex)
    Yes, I don't see a problem with treating 'across .... from' as a single prepositional construction. The exact terminology for this is not my strong point.
     
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