[across-the-nation] used as an adjective?

High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone:

Can I say "across-the-nation university entrance examination" instead of " the national university entrance examination" ?

He was ranked hundredth in the-across-the-nation university entrance examination.

Thanks
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It would be 'cross-the-nation' if it were acceptable for your context.
    'Nationwide' entrance exam fits well.
     

    BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I have looked up 'across the board' (this is the correct form) and so 'across the nation'
    I guess would be the correct form if it fit nicely but it doesn't and 'across the board' means pertaining to all and doesn't fit either.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Another vote for "nationwide" (also possible "countrywide") = "practiced (or here 'accepted') throughout the nation". We say "national anthem", "national symbol", etc.
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    I have looked up 'across the board' (this is the correct form) and so 'across the nation'
    I guess would be the correct form if it fit nicely but it doesn't and 'across the board' means pertaining to all and doesn't fit either.
    Okay. Then, why should it be "cross-the-nation" and not "across-the-nation"?
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Don't use any of these compound forms as adjectives, really. At best, they sounds very strained and awkward in that position. Stick with "national" or "nationwide."
     
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