ACS’ products made a significant breakthrough in sales , which led ACS to be the leading supplier.

xuliang

Senior Member
Chinese Mandarin
I was describing what happened to a company. “In 2015, in the North American aftermarket, ACS’ oil filters made a significant breakthrough in sales , which led ACS to be the leading supplier in the market.” For the part in bold, I wanted to mean, in that year, the company's products' sale increased a lot and this helped the company to be the leading supplier (having the most market share in the market)

I often see "lead to" used together, and sometimes it has a negative connotation.For the bold part, I am wondering if it's correct or odd. Thank you.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I think you need to say this led ACS to "become", not "be". Other than that, you are using it correctly. This is a common use of "lead to" with no negative connotations.
     

    Mrs JJJ

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (British)
    Though from the point of view of style, it would probably be better not to use two forms of the verb lead in the same phrase - i.e. 'led to' and 'leading'. (I would also talk about a company making a breakthrough in sales of a product, rather than the product itself making the breakthrough. But perhaps the latter usage is now common in the field of sales, in which I am no expert.)

    I might say:

    ..ACS made a significant breakthrough in sales of its oil filters.....

    .., and, as a result, ACS became the leading supplier......

    I'd break it into two parts and use 'and' in order to avoid the difficulty of having to decide whether to use the correct (I believe) but rather clumsy: which resulted in ACS's becoming...
    or the probably more common: which resulted in ACS becoming

    One could, of course, say simply: ... which resulted in the company's becoming but then, of course, one would lose the repetition of the company's name, which it is probably important to keep. :)

    Another possibility would be: ...which enabled the company to become... but I think that this changes the sense too much.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    Though from the point of view of style, it would probably be better not to use two forms of the verb lead in the same phrase - i.e. 'led to' and 'leading'. (I would also talk about a company making a breakthrough in sales of a product, rather than the product itself making the breakthrough. But perhaps the latter usage is now common in the field of sales, in which I am no expert.)

    I might say:

    ..ACS made a significant breakthrough in sales of its oil filters.....

    .., and, as a result, ACS became the leading supplier......

    I'd break it into two parts and use 'and' in order to avoid the difficulty of having to decide whether to use the correct (I believe) but rather clumsy: which resulted in ACS's becoming...
    or the probably more common: which resulted in ACS becoming

    One could, of course, say simply: ... which resulted in the company's becoming but then, of course, one would lose the repetition of the company's name, which it is probably important to keep. :)

    Another possibility would be: ...which enabled the company to become... but I think that this changes the sense too much.
    Dojibear, Mrs JJJ, thank you very much for your detailed answers.
     
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