Act: act uninterested vs act like you're not interested

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Hello,


Which option is appropriate (natural) in my examples below?


a. Some people like to act uninterested when they're doing business. It's a way of getting an advantage.
b. What? You don't want to come with us? Stop acting uninterested. I know you enjoy going out on Saturdays. Come on! Let's go.

Vs

c. Some people like to act like they're not interested when they're doing business. It's a way of getting an advantage.
d. What? You don't want to come with us? Stop acting like you're not interested. I know you enjoy going out on Saturdays. Come on! Let's go.

Meaning intended: pretend not to be interested, like or want something.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • harbottle

    Senior Member
    Australia; English
    Nice question. Related word: "disinterested", which is subtly different to b) and d)

    I do not think there is a difference between "uninterested" and "not interested", save for economy of language. In a written text I would use "uninterested" because you can express it in fewer terms but in spoken dialogue I would use "not interested" because it sounds more natural. That is based on personal taste however and I definitely do not think that there is any difference in meaning at all.
     

    harbottle

    Senior Member
    Australia; English
    My strong preference is for ​d)

    I don't see anything wrong with it at all. b) is fine too but sounds a little awkward to my ear.
     

    harbottle

    Senior Member
    Australia; English
    No in your case I definitely think that this is the best sentence:

    "What? You don't want to come with us? Stop acting like you're not interested. I know you enjoy going out on Saturdays. Come on! Let's go."
     
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