active participle - intransitive verb

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Haydari

Member
English
Transitive verbs need an object to convey its meaning. Intransitive verbs do not need an object to convey its meaning. So the passive participle noun (ma3fool) can be derived from transitive verbs form 1, but not from intransitive verbs form 1.

My question is:

Can the active participle noun (faa3il) be derived from intransitive verbs form 1? I ask because I've never seen the faa3il form of any intransitive verbs form 1. I only see the fa3eel form of intransitive verbs form 1.

Examples:

kabira (to be big) = kabeer (big) but I've never seen the form kaabir
saghira (to be small) = sagheer (small) but I've never seen the form saaghir
jamila (to be beautiful) = jameel (beautiful) but I've never seen the form jaamil


Is my understanding correct or incorrect?
 
  • analeeh

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    The fa3iil adjective seems to be some sort of resultative originally, which puts it in a similar semantic area to participles. Some transitive verbs have a fa3iil derived from them that is equivalent to their passive participle (سجين, طليق etc), whilst some intransitive~stative verbs have a fa3iil that is sort of equivalent in meaning to an active participle. That doesn't mean those verbs don't have distinct active or passive participles, though. That said, it seems like most stative verbs, though - like كبر - don't have participles, and only have equivalent adjectives.
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    In Aramaic, the equivalent of the fa3iil form is used as the regular passive participle, so it is likely that fa3iil and maf3uul (which was originally fa3uul with the m- prefix added) were originally variants of each other.
     

    Haydari

    Member
    English
    In my current understanding, the active participle (faa3il) is only derived from verbs that are transitive. But I am a bit confused because there are words like "waa7id" and "kaamil". These words are of the wazn faa3il yet they are derived from intransitive verbs. I would've expected "wa7eed" and "kameel" as sifah mushahbbah instead because the verbs are intransitive and stative. Does this have to do with the concept "quasi active participle" ?
     
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