actress or actor

Cared

Member
Mexico español
Hola a todos:

¿Podrían ayudarme con la siguiente duda?
¿Por qué es común referirnos en inglés a una mujer que actúa como actor en vez de actríz? Lo he visto en varias ocasiones y ahora que voy a dar clase quiero estar seguro de la información.

Gracias.
 
  • lostigres15

    New Member
    English - American
    Hola. Creo que es común, y no hay explicación concreta. Muchas veces se usa "actors" si se refiere a un grupo de muchas personas que son mujeres y hombres, pero también se usa si la persona quiere enfasís en la habilidad de la actríz.

    Pero pienso que es algo un poco raro de la lengua conversacional.
     

    St. Nick

    Senior Member
    English
    Hola

    Por razones de igualdad, cuando nos referimos a la mujer ya no la llamamos 'actress,' sino 'actor,' desde hace como veinte años. Entonces, vaya a lo seguro si no le gustaría provocar su ira. ;)
     

    rsb

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    Para afirmar la igualdad las llamais en masculino? Perdona pero en todo el mundo las feministas hacen el contrario de lo que acabas de decir! Promueven el uso del femenino... No del masculino! Nada mas porque las lenguas ya son suficientemente machistas...
     

    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hola, aún a riesgo de desviarme del tema, y por mucho que digan los grupos feministas, el género por excelencia para designar a personas de ambos sexos es el masculino (RAE). De ahí que "actor" englobe a los dos géneros posiblemente.
     

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Para afirmar la igualdad las llamais en masculino? Perdona pero en todo el mundo las feministas hacen el contrario de lo que acabas de decir! Promueven el uso del femenino... No del masculino! Nada mas porque las lenguas ya son suficientemente machistas...
    But actor is masculine just as long as actress exists, isn't it? After all and as a general rule, the English language has no inflectional grammatical gender, as far as I can tell.
     

    rsb

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    But actor is masculine just as long as actress exists, isn't it? After all and as a general rule, the English language has no inflectional grammatical gender, as far as I can tell.
    English has not grammatical gender in the same way that, for example, Italian, Spanish and French have. Except a few exceptions, when you speak English you don't need to identify anyone or anything with a gender,
    which is great. Anyway please consider that this is not always true.

    I was just replying to the affirmation that "to promote equality, use the masculine form even for a woman". This is never true, and it is exactly the opposite of the truth. No one even just a bit involved with feminism or equal opportunity would have said that.

    Maybe there is some part of the story that is missing; maybe there was a social debate about the use of "actress"... I would like to know
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Yes, there is a problem. The ending 'tress' is used mostly for low wage jobs. Waitress, stewardess, seamstress, etc. So for the last years, the 'actresses' don't like to be called as such. So it's not the fact that they want to use the feminine ending, but the low class jobs it was used for.
    (Trust me, I have the "luck" of having a daughter who is an 'actor' in N.York, - and she'd kill me if I'd say it otherwise).
    There are other reasons : Jewess - slightly derogatory. But the ending is -ess, not -'tress', which seems to be worse.
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    English has not grammatical gender in the same way that, for example, Italian, Spanish and French have. Except a few exceptions, when you speak English you don't need to identify anyone or anything with a gender,
    which is great. Anyway please consider that this is not always true.

    I was just replying to the affirmation that "to promote equality, use the masculine form even for a woman". This is never true, and it is exactly the opposite of the truth. No one even just a bit involved with feminism or equal opportunity would have said that.

    Maybe there is some part of the story that is missing; maybe there was a social debate about the use of "actress"... I would like to know
    You don't have to deal with the "his/her" problem though. I never got the problem of using "waiter" or "waitress." Other languages mark gender on everything. Maybe if English were a bit more consistent there wouldn't be a problem.
     

    uspantan

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thanks, duvija, for that anecdote. I suspect that the change will soon be convention. Very few professions have two forms based on gender. So this would be a case of forcing the acting profession to fit the pattern. 'Stewardess' became 'flight attendant' or 'cabin crew' a few decades ago.
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with rsb. Mostly, English doesn't mark genders, but when it does, political correctness wants to erase the distinction. While female Spanish medical professionals want "médica", female English dramatic artists want "actor". The former want to be identified in their own right, the latter don't want to be segregated by question of sex. It's a crazy world.
    (And, as a female, I've never believed much that attitudes will be changed by modifying grammar - tone and respectful language are much more important, in my opinion)
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I agree with rsb. Mostly, English doesn't mark genders, but when it does, political correctness wants to erase the distinction. While female Spanish medical professionals want "médica", female English dramatic artists want "actor". The former want to be identified in their own right, the latter don't want to be segregated by question of sex. It's a crazy world.
    (And, as a female, I've never believed much that attitudes will be changed by modifying grammar - tone and respectful language are much more important, in my opinion)
    Right!
     

    osinos2001

    New Member
    Español
    Yes, there is a problem. The ending 'tress' is used mostly for low wage jobs. Waitress, stewardess, seamstress, etc. So for the last years, the 'actresses' don't like to be called as such. So it's not the fact that they want to use the feminine ending, but the low class jobs it was used for.
    (Trust me, I have the "luck" of having a daughter who is an 'actor' in N.York, - and she'd kill me if I'd say it otherwise).
    There are other reasons : Jewess - slightly derogatory. But the ending is -ess, not -'tress', which seems to be worse.
    I think is something wrong in your sentence regarding the ending "-ess". Please, note: prince-princess, emperor-empress, god-goddess, abby-abbess, prior-prioress, Even more, nothing to do with lower wages: lion-lioness, etc.
    The explanation is simple: this ending is borrowed from French.
    R/
     
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