Ad and ed before a vowel

Isapaola

Senior Member
Italian Italy
Split from here.

Sorry to intrude, but I don't agree with the frequent use of connecting forms ad and ed or even od before a vowel. Current recommendations from publishers say that we can use them only between the same vowels
(ad Ancona, ed ecco) but NEVER ed io, or od anche. The only exception seems to be ad esempio.
I will be glad to know if any of you know more about that: I quite often find it difficult to decide which is right. This is a good opportunity for me to learn more. Thanks for your help, as usual.
 
  • Raphillon

    Senior Member
    Italy
    Isapaola said:
    Sorry to intrude, but I don't agree with the frequent use of connecting forms ad and ed or even od before a vowel. Current recommendations from publishers say that we can use them only between the same vowels
    (ad Ancona, ed ecco) but NEVER ed io, or od anche. The only exception seems to be ad esempio.
    I will be glad to know if any of you know more about that: I quite often find it difficult to decide which is right. This is a good opportunity for me to learn more. Thanks for your help, as usual.
    To despite of what pubblishers may say I think often both forms are acceptable. But there is always the rhytm of what you write... :)
     

    Aloha

    Senior Member
    Spanish (BCN)
    I often find a "-d" attached to a preposition or conjunction when they are beside a noun starting by a vowel.

    Eg.:

    -Stavamo andando ad Ancona ed invece siamo rimasti a casa.

    What about the "o"? Does it also requires a "-d"?

    -Scegli questi o-d altri?

    Or shall I say "oppure"?

    Thanks in advance.
     

    saia

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    E' quella "d" che si mette tra due vocali per migliorare il suono (eufonica viene dal greco e significa "dal bel suono"). Si usa solo tra due vocali uguali, esempio: ad Atene, Carlo ed Enrico eccetera.
     
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