Adapt yourself to the environment

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,


One of my friends who’s now serving her internship in a high school, and she complained to me last night that she was having a tough time dealing with her students. She is annoyed by her students’ behaviors and she also can’t understand why all those high-school girls like pop stars very deeply, or crazily.


And I told her that students are innocent, they are influenced by the culture and the surroundings. What she needs to do is to communicate with them rather than complain. I said:


You have to adapt your to the environment.


I wonder if the phrase is natural here. I want to say that she has to adapt to the students.


Thanks a lot
 
  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    I think "environment" implies more than just the students. Either way, if you want to use "adapt" then you'd say "you have to adapt to the environment", the second "your" shouldn't be there.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Sorry, I wanted to say:

    You have to adapt yourself to the environment.

    Is that fine in my context? I think so.
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    It's enough to say that "you adapt to the environment". Since you already said "you" the second reference - "yourself" - isn't really necessary.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I don't have any problems with "you have to adapt yourself to the environment", Silver.

    In your context, I might say: You need to be/remain flexible in those situations.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    The answers above are correct, but nevertheless "adapt yourself to the environment" doesn't mean "communicate with them rather than complain."
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Dear Silver,
    I can't see any need for 'yourself' in 'you need to adapt to the environment'.

    But I suggest there's a need for something after 'adapt', something like 'your approach' or 'your methods', maybe, at a more personal level, 'your attitude'.

    When we find ourselves in an unfamiliar environment, we have to adapt in whatever ways are required to fit in, if that's what we need or want to do. We may have to change ourselves in some way. I'm thinking of living in a foreign country, for example. That's what I call 'an environment'. If I went to teach in China I would have all sorts of adaptations to make, in order to make the best of my stay and give my best to my students. I would want to make a good impression as an Englishwoman/Westerner, apart from anything else.

    We adapt all the time to the changing demands of the micro-environments we find ourselves in, throughout the day, from hour to hour. When I get in the car of my favourite mini-cab driver, the genuine, kind and generous cockney Dave, who's young enough to be my son, I am in his environment for several minutes. He addresses me as 'Babe'. Do I complain? :D

    Your friend will never change her young students, however much she disapproves of them. The thing is to use whatever interests them, to help their learning. Find material about these pop singers and adapt it to suit their learning needs. Most professionals need to be non-judgemental in their approach to their work if they want to be successful.

    Anyway, I suggest that 'environment' alone isn't exactly the right word, although this environment might be fine in this particular context.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    Dear Silver,
    I can't see any need for 'yourself' in 'you need to adapt to the environment'.

    But I suggest there's a need for something after 'adapt', something like 'your approach' or 'your methods', maybe, at a more personal level, 'your attitude'.

    When we find ourselves in an unfamiliar environment, we have to adapt in whatever ways are required to fit in, if that's what we need or want to do. We may have to change ourselves in some way. I'm thinking of living in a foreign country, for example. That's what I call 'an environment'. If I went to teach in China I would have all sorts of adaptations to make, in order to make the best of my stay and give my best to my students. I would want to make a good impression as an Englishwoman/Westerner, apart from anything else.

    We adapt all the time to the changing demands of the micro-environments we find ourselves in, throughout the day, from hour to hour. When I get in the car of my favourite mini-cab driver, the genuine, kind and generous cockney Dave, who's young enough to be my son, I am in his environment for several minutes. He addresses me as 'Babe'. Do I complain? :D

    Your friend will never change her young students, however much she disapproves of them. The thing is to use whatever interests them, to help their learning. Find material about these pop singers and adapt it to suit their learning needs. Most professionals need to be non-judgemental in their approach to their work if they want to be successful.

    Anyway, I suggest that 'environment' alone isn't exactly the right word, although this environment might be fine in this particular context.
    HI, Hermione Golightly, so do you have another substitute for "this environment" in the context of OP (by silverobama)?"
     
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