Add a tasty combination of spices

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

Does this work? :

Add a tasty combination of spices to the meat before you marinate it.Afterwards, put it on skewer.

Is there a better word than tasty that I can use here?
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I knew that tasty does not feel right.

    Would tangy be used for turmeric and cinnamon?
    If you are translating a recipe and already told us what is in the spice mix you can just say “add THE spice mix.”

    If you are writing some waffley description of a recipe you can say what you want. Rich/tasty/traditional/tangy. It’s not crucial.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    If you are translating a recipe and already told us what is in the spice mix you can just say “add THE spice mix.”

    If you are writing some waffley description of a recipe you can say what you want. Rich/tasty/traditional/tangy. It’s not crucial.
    Did you see this?
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    I have looked up "tangy" because I don't know exactly what kind of taste that is, but I'd say I'm even more confused now. I have found translated into Spanish <——-Spanish words removed by moderator (Florentia52)——-> But for me those are completely different tastes; acid is like lemon, "picante" is "hot" as in hot chile, or a hot curry.
    Can somebody help?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    I have looked up "tangy" because I don't know exactly what kind of taste that is, but I'd say I'm even more confused now. I have found, translated into Spanish, both ácido and picante. But for me those are completely different tastes; acid is like lemon, "picante" is "hot" as in hot chile, or a hot curry.
    Can somebody help?
    Before he mentioned the spices in the mix I offered tangy alongside of rich. Then he took up the tangy question after he mention turmeric and cinnamon. I would stick with rich to avoid confusion, it applies to a wide variety of flavors.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you are writing a recipe, I suggest you look up some recipes! They give precise instructions.
    I wouldn't know what 'tangy' means in a meat patty recipe.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I have looked up "tangy" because I don't know exactly what kind of taste that is, but I'd say I'm even more confused now. I have found, translated into Spanish, both ácido and picante. But for me those are completely different tastes; acid is like lemon, "picante" is "hot" as in hot chile, or a hot curry.
    Can somebody help?
    Taste and it’s describing words are notoriously personal and imprecise. You need not be confused. Just imagine chilli and lime together. That’s tangy.

    We don’t really need chilli type heat to call something tangy.
    Chilli heat is often called “spicy” in a terms of its impact on a whole dish.
     

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    "...season it with a rich blend of spices" is correct use of the words, but it also sounds like you're advertising, not giving step-by-step instructions. "Rich blend" is classic ad-talk, telling people how they're supposed to feel about that particular combination. Even without that, "...season it with the spices" is needlessly restating obvious information, because the verb "season" already has the meaning of "spices" built in; that one word alone means "add spices", so "...season it with the spices" would mean "use the spices to add spices".

    It's roughly like that fact that the verb "drive" inherently means using a vehicle, and for each individual person it normally means driving that particular person's vehicle, so we don't normally say stuff like "I drove a vehicle to the store" or "I drove my own car to the store"; we say "I drove to the store", and the rest of that information is already built-in.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Yes:thumbsup: to Delvo's post above (I think suzi br was saying something similar in another of your threads).

    (Also "forget not the salt")
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "...season it with a rich blend of spices" is correct use of the words, but it also sounds like you're advertising, not giving step-by-step instructions. "Rich blend" is classic ad-talk, telling people how they're supposed to feel about that particular combination. Even without that, "...season it with the spices" is needlessly restating obvious information, because the verb "season" already has the meaning of "spices" built in; that one word alone means "add spices", so "...season it with the spices" would mean "use the spices to add spices".

    It's roughly like that fact that the verb "drive" inherently means using a vehicle, and for each individual person it normally means driving that particular person's vehicle, so we don't normally say stuff like "I drove a vehicle to the store" or "I drove my own car to the store"; we say "I drove to the store", and the rest of that information is already built-in.
    What if I say "season the meat with a fiery blend" ?
    Because season alone would not suggest fiery or salty. Also, it is rather general but maybe for a specific taste I could use something after it.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You are totally missing the point that we are trying to make. If you are writing a REAL recipe for something you do NOT need any of this surplus vocabulary.
    You just tell people exactly what to use without using any (pointless) adjectives.
    Equally: you do not need to use the verb SEASON with spices, because everyone knows that spices are used in this way.

    If, however, you are writing a generic description of roughly how kebabs are made it really doesn't matter much what adjective you use. Taste is subjective anyway. However, don't use fiery unless you are using chilli/garlic in your recipe. Turmeric and cinnamon are not really classed as fiery because they are not hot spices in the way that chilli and garlic are.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You are totally missing the point that we are trying to make. If you are writing a REAL recipe for something you do NOT need any of this surplus vocabulary.
    You just tell people exactly what to use without using any (pointless) adjectives.
    Equally: you do not need to use the verb SEASON with spices, because everyone knows that spices are used in this way.

    If, however, you are writing a generic description of roughly how kebabs are made it really doesn't matter much what adjective you use. Taste is subjective anyway. However, don't use fiery unless you are using chilli/garlic in your recipe. Turmeric and cinnamon are not really classed as fiery because they are not hot spices in the way that chilli and garlic are.
    Thanks Suzy. I just wanted to know if "season the meat with a fiery blend of spices" is generally correct in different situations not just my situation. When, for example, you are talking about a food in which you use black pepper to season the meat.
    I like using these collocations in once sentence and it sounds nice to me but you say using season and spice in the same sentence is superfluous.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Thanks Suzy. I just wanted to know if "season the meat with a fiery blend of spices" is generally correct in different situations not just my situation. When, for example, you are talking about a food in which you use black pepper to season the meat.
    I like using these collocations in once sentence and it sounds nice to me but you say using season and spice in the same sentence is superfluous.
    Yes, in a generic sense you could say that.

    It would be superfluous in a RECIPE. It would be fine in some generic chit chat about food styles. I guess you are not used to reading recipes in your own language? The best recipes are brisk and factual and don't use excess words. The trend is for some books to have a paragraph or two in addition to the actual list of ingredients and method. Excess words and adjectives are OK there.
     

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I can't picture someone saying that in a casual conversation... other than if someone is mocking how corny advertisements sound for their tendency to overdescribe.

    "Blend of spices" would normally just be "spices", and, instead of any adjective like you've been asking about, it would normally get either no particular description or a more specific one: "add some spices", "season it however you want", "add some cayanne & jalapeño peppers".

    Also, black pepper would never be called "fiery".
     
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