addition and subtraction math facts with sums up to 10

NickJunior

Senior Member
Khmer
Hello Forum,

Here is a quote that reads, "Students who do not demonstrate proficiency in addition and subtraction math facts with sums up to 10 by the end of the school year will be recommended for retention."

Does the statement above mean:
(a) To get promoted, the student must pass addition facts with sums up to 10?

(b) To get promoted, the student must pass addition facts with sums up to 10 and subtraction facts with differences up to 10?

I choose choice (a) because the statement explicitly states only "the sums up to 10". The word "sum" is associated with only addition. What do you think? Any suggestions will help. Thanks in advance.


 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I am sure that (b) is intended, but it would be better stated like this (for the confusing reason you mentioned):

    "Students who do not demonstrate proficiency in addition and subtraction math facts with numbers up to 10 by the end of the school year will be recommended for retention."
     

    NickJunior

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    I am sure that (b) is intended, but it would be better stated like this (for the confusing reason you mentioned):

    "Students who do not demonstrate proficiency in addition and subtraction math facts with numbers up to 10 by the end of the school year will be recommended for retention."
    Thanks Copyright. I think your understanding is accurate because the statement includes the term "subtraction facts".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I had the same reaction as sound shift, but "math facts" does seem to be used - I found the following (possibly the source of Nick's text?) here:
    Retention at Grade 1

    First grade students who attend, but do not demonstrate proficiency at mid-year, first grade, in reading and who do not demonstrate proficiency in addition and subtraction math facts with sums up to 10 by the end of the school year will be recommended for retention.
    I agree with Copyright that "sums" here means "numbers".

    EDIT: I found this discussion of "math facts". Perhaps it just means "basic arithmetic"? (or possibly "mental arithmetic"?)
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Retention at Grade 1

    First grade students who attend, but do not demonstrate proficiency at mid-year, first grade, in reading and who do not demonstrate proficiency in addition and subtraction math facts with sums up to 10 by the end of the school year will be recommended for retention.
    ~~~AAARRGGHHHH~~~
    Nick Junior's version is a lot better :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Math facts" are the simple additions, subtractions, multiplications and divisions that are learned by rote memorization. For example in addition, "1 + 1 = 2". If you have memorized "0 + 0 = 0" through "10 + 10 = 100" you are then have a basis to do more complex additions (232389 + 588488 = ?) as "math problems" without having to count on your fingers.
     

    CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    I agree with Copyright that "sums" here means "numbers".
    But I'm guessing they want to say they're excluding questions like "5 + 6" or "9 + 8", because the answers are greater than 10. To express this explicitly, you need to say something like NickJunior's (b). In the original text, I can understand why they only talk about sums (because the differences won't ever go above 10). But the wording is awkward. I imagine they also won't test the kids on things like "3 – 8"…

    Edit: So on second thought I think what they mean to say is that the students must master addition and subtraction using numbers from 0 to 10, with (correct) answers between 0 and 10 — or 1 to 10, whichever the case may be.

    "0 + 0 = 0" through "10 + 10 = 100"
    It's true, if they're doing base 2 arithmetic in Grade 1 they won't get very far if they have to stop at "10"… :D
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Math facts" are the simple additions, subtractions, multiplications and divisions that are learned by rote memorization. For example in addition, "1 + 1 = 2". If you have memorized "0 + 0 = 0" through "10 + 10 = 100" you are then have a basis to do more complex additions (232389 + 588488 = ?) as "math problems" without having to count on your fingers.
    Thanks, Myridon - understood!

    I guess your "10 + 10 = 100" is in binary;)?
    EDIT: As CapnPrep has just said:D.
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The evidence before us suggests strongly that those who write these statements ought to have been retained in First Grade. Six really intelligent people are having serious trouble understanding what this sentence means. I don't understand it either.
     
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