additional doses of 0.15 μg/kg <at> 10 minutes

Makel Leki

Senior Member
Russian
From PLOS Medicine (INS stands for intranasal sufentanil, and IVM for intravenous morphine):
In a prospective, randomized, multicenter non-inferiority trial conducted in the emergency departments of 6 hospitals across France, patients were randomized 1:1 to INS titration (0.3 μg/kg and additional doses of 0.15 μg/kg at 10 minutes and 20 minutes if numerical pain rating scale [NRS] > 3) and intravenous placebo, or to IVM (0.1 mg/kg and additional doses of 0.05 mg/kg at 10 minutes and 20 minutes if NRS > 3) and IN placebo. Patients, clinical staff, and research staff were blinded to the treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the total decrease on NRS at 30 minutes after first administration.
Why "at"? What does it mean, and how is it different from "in"?

Since that kind of research requires precision, I'm guessing "at" is used to refer to the exact time the researchers waited before administering additional doses. So, for example, if the drug being tested was administered at 9.00 AM, "at 30 minutes" would mean 9.30 AM, and "at 10 minutes" would mean 9.10 AM, not a minute more, not a minute less. "In" might be ambiguous for a research paper because it can mean "within."
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "At" refers to a point of time after the commencement ("first administration", as this quote has it). It has a technical meaning in this context, so if the first dose was given at 10:25, the second and third doses will be given at 10:35 and 10:45. The key thing here is what does "at 20 minutes" mean for the third dose, is it 20 minutes after the first dose or 20 minutes after the second dose? Using "at", it is unambiguously 20 minutes after the first dose. No other word on its own conveys this meaning.

    This use does not exist in ordinary English.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "At" refers to a point of time after the commencement ("first administration", as this quote has it). It has a technical meaning in this context, so if the first dose was given at 10:25, the second and third doses will be given at 10:35 and 10:45. The key thing here is what does "at 20 minutes" mean for the third dose, is it 20 minutes after the first dose or 20 minutes after the second dose? Using "at", it is unambiguously 20 minutes after the first dose. No other word on its own conveys this meaning.

    This use does not exist in ordinary English.
    :thumbsup:
    It is typically used for specifying elapsed times for a timeline with a defined starting point - like the description of particluar event on a more familiar timeline - a YouTube video, for example. "Listen to what he says at 3:23 in this video". Not sure if that counts as "ordinary English":)

    When providing the source, it would help (in general for posts lile this) to provide a specific reference, not just "PLOS Medicine"). In this case : Intranasal sufentanil versus intravenous morphine for acute severe trauma pain: A double-blind randomized non-inferiority study
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top