Additional explanation between two commas

lobador

Senior Member
Turkish-Turkey
Hi all,

As I know, we can make an additional explanation between two commas into an English sentence. However, I'm not sure that whether we can use these commas in anywhere in the sentence.

Is there any rule for this?

Which using are correct in the below?

There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest, for example, that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.

There are tribes, for example, in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.

There are, for example, tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.


Thanks in advance.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Could you tell us what is being quoted as an example in each of those three sentences? We'll then be able to tell you if you have placed the commas correctly.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    All are correct. There is no "rule" - English does not really have rules - it has guidance, suggestions, and common usage. :)

    Commas offset phrases to show that the phrases are in parenthesis as an "additional thought" but not essential to the meaning of the sentence.

    You can also say:

    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world, for example.
    For example, there are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have, for example, been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been, for example, completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched, for example, by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforestthat have been completely untouched by, for example,
    the technological developments of the developed world.

    The ", for example," tends to qualify the following phrase but can be omitted completely.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Sorry Barque, I seem to have shot your fox. :D I took the question at a simpler level and, not anticipating such a quick reply from lobador, added a little to my original ->" The ", for example," tends to qualify the following phrase but can be omitted completely."

    I agree that if the OP wishes to be specific about the nuance of any of the positions - he's free to ask. (Although a less wordy example would be more convenient.)
     

    lobador

    Senior Member
    Turkish-Turkey
    Hi @Barque and @PaulQ

    Actually, I wanted to ask:

    Is there any nuance difference in these samples:

    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world, for example.
    For example, there are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have, for example, been completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been, for example, completely untouched by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforest that have been completely untouched, for example, by the technological developments of the developed world.
    There are tribes in the Amazon Rainforestthat have been completely untouched by, for example, the technological developments of the developed world.

    or
    have all of them exactly same mean?
     

    lobador

    Senior Member
    Turkish-Turkey
    I can add one more quick example.

    There are, fortunately, lots of good people in the world.

    There are lots of good people, fortunately, in the world.

    Two sentences in the above are same?
     
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