Additional remark [complement / compliment]

Gross_Nerd

Member
Chinese-Taiwan
Hi all, thx for your view.

May I say "additional remark" to express the meaning that additional words I would like to add or complement?

If not, what words would be better to present that?

Thanks for your answers.
 
  • Gross_Nerd

    Member
    Chinese-Taiwan
    Please show us how you plan to use this: in a sentence, as a heading, something else?
    Thx for your reply.
    When writing a mail, I have sent one to someone.
    But I forget to add one thing, I would like to complement the content of mail.
    Is suitable to use "additional remark" as the title of the mail? or which way is better?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    For an email subject line, I might use "One more thing ..."

    For safety's sake, you might like to include the original email in the message body so the recipient doesn't have to look at two emails to get your entire message. But do what you think best.
     

    Gross_Nerd

    Member
    Chinese-Taiwan
    For an email subject line, I might use "One more thing ..."

    For safety's sake, you might like to include the original email in the message body so the recipient doesn't have to look at two emails to get your entire message. But do what you think best.
    Thanks again for your reply.
    Actually, I would like to write another mail to complement the content of previous mail.
    And what bothers me a lot is the subject.
    "One more thing" sounds too casual, could you provide another way to express that for me?
    I have searched the dictionary and the result was "additional remark".
    Do you think the result can fit the situation?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Addition to my previous email

    Ignore the last email – this is more complete :) And then put everything you want to say in one email.

    Right now, I'm going through a couple of dozen emails from one client and each of them adds an incremental bit of information to the last one, so you have to assemble them all to understand what's going on, especially if there have been minor changes in instructions. At some point, I recommend just drawing a line under previous emails and putting all the information in one summary email with a subject line of "Summary of the last dozen emails."

    People don't like reading ... and they especially don't like reading when they have to refer to previous information. You are not the only one emailing them.
     

    Gross_Nerd

    Member
    Chinese-Taiwan
    Addition to my previous email

    Ignore the last email – this is more complete :) And then put everything you want to say in one email.

    Right now, I'm going through a couple of dozen emails from one client and each of them adds an incremental bit of information to the last one, so you have to assemble them all to understand what's going on, especially if there have been minor changes in instructions. At some point, I recommend just drawing a line under previous emails and putting all the information in one summary email with a subject line of "Summary of the last dozen emails."

    People don't like reading ... and they especially don't like reading when they have to refer to previous information. You are not the only one emailing them.
    Thanks for your sharing.
    I got your point.
    To my confusion, if I use "compliment" as the subject to the mail, do you think it's okay? Acceptable?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The word you're looking for is "complement," with an "e" – you'll want to look up the difference between that and compliment. But no, I wouldn't use it ... it will just be confusing. You would have to say "Complement to my previous email," but that is simply odd.
     

    Gross_Nerd

    Member
    Chinese-Taiwan
    The word you're looking for is "complement," with an "e" – you'll want to look up the difference between that and compliment. But no, I wouldn't use it ... it will just be confusing. You would have to say "Complement to my previous email," but that is simply odd.
    Sorry...could you imagine how hard I tried to memorize the two words with one-letter difference but crazily different meaning...
    Okay, I see. Thanks for your reply and help.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Sorry...could you imagine how hard I tried to memorize the two words with one-letter difference but crazily different meaning...
    Okay, I see. Thanks for your reply and help.
    Yes we can imagine, we all struggle with that! ;)
    I think copyright's advice at post number 8 is spot on, both in terms of language use and effective communications.
     

    Gross_Nerd

    Member
    Chinese-Taiwan
    Yes we can imagine, we all struggle with that! ;)
    I think copyright's advice at post number 8 is spot on, both in terms of language use and effective communications.
    Seriously? Those two confuse you English native speaker as well?
    I thought that was my problem(not proficient in English enough).
    Alright, thx for your encouragement anyway. Have a good day.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Seriously? Those two confuse you English native speaker as well?
    They don't confuse a lot of native English speakers because a lot of native English speakers don't know there are two different words. :D They just use "compliment" for everything.
     
    Last edited:

    Gross_Nerd

    Member
    Chinese-Taiwan
    They don't confuse a lot of native English speakers because a lot of native English speakers don't know there are two different words. :D The just use "compliment" for everything.
    Well...I will request myself to distinguish them even though they have same pronunciation...:eek:
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The Oxford Dictionaries website -- English (UK) agrees with you. There is a difference between the noun and verb forms of both words:

    compliment (noun) /ˈkɒmplɪm(ə)nt/
    (verb) /ˈkɒmplɪmɛnt/

    complement: (noun) /ˈkɒmplɪm(ə)nt/
    (verb) /ˈkɒmplɪmɛnt/
    It seems that some people make a distinction in pronunciation, but most of us don't.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I pronounce the nouns differently, but don't know how to write it in IPA.

    That is, "to pay a compliment" has a clear "i"as in "it", whereas in "the ship's complement" the first "e" is a weakly voiced sound somewhere between "eh" and "uh".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Sorry, but what is your point? I don't speak Australian or Canadian. As Cagey said, some people make a distinction, others don't. And what does "ODE" mean? It is not on the forum list of approved abbreviations.
     
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